The Slippery Slope Is Real

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It was called the slippery slope. A pro-life argument that legalizing and normalizing abortion would lead to further disregard for human life. It was part of the discussion in the early years of the pro-life cause.

 

Abortion would lead to infanticide and then, first passive, then active, euthanasia.

 

In 1982, the case of Baby Doe continued the slide. Baby Doe had been born with Down Syndrome and a need for surgery to connect his esophagus to his stomach. It’s a fairly common defect. And usually, there is no question about doing the surgery.

 

But this boy’s parents hadn’t signed up for an imperfect child. They refused permission for the surgery. The Indiana Supreme Court concurred. Baby Doe starved to death before his case could be heard by SCOTUS.

 

For the parents, problem solved. A retro-active abortion.

 

There had been other Baby Doe’s. But their doctors had concurred that starvation was best. Their stories did not make it to the courts or the news stands.

 

And their stories did not get a legal stamp of approval by a court.

There was a backlash to the Baby Doe story–and to numerous stories of children surviving abortion.

We had legalized death. But we had not yet normalized it.

So the Baby Doe Rules and Born Alive Acts. That battle continues with a federal bill proposed this year.

The 1973 Roe v. Wade SCOTUS decision indeed had been a turning point–perhaps a tipping point for Western Civilization. Other Western nations had eased abortion restrictions, but none provided the sweeping liberality of Roe.

Few realize even today that Roe eliminated every abortion restriction in all 50 states. Abortion became legal at any time in pregnancy and for any reason.

Some states have managed to pass some restrictions. But the fight continues to bring abortion facility standards up to that of an ear piercing mall operation.

There were and still are very few protections against the kind of abuse Kermit Gosnell foisted upon viable children and their desperate mothers.

Gosnell was a physician, but one who had failed to complete his residency in gynecology/obstetrics.

Supporters of Roe and previous efforts to liberalize abortion laws claimed abortion needed to be legal because of back alley abortions in which women were maimed or killed. Gosnell was a back alley butcher who maimed and killed. And he had a Main Street business.

Yes, we legalized abortion. But had not yet normalized it.

We are uncomfortable with the idea that Planned Parenthood’s minions were selling baby parts for profit. That they were adjusting abortion procedures to ensure the acquisition of salable parts, giving less regard to the aborting mother’s safety.

It wasn’t just Gosnell bringing the back alley to Main Street. The abortion industry IS the back alley with a shiny sign and a big budget.

So in the early days of the pro-life cause, we expected that being pro-life would eventually mean fighting the same war at the other end of life. And here we are. Several states have already legalized assisted suicide. Others are considering it.

We don’t have to look very far around our small world to see what’s next.

Japan legalized abortion in 1949. The goal had been to create a “genetically healthy population.” Today, that nation has seen a serious uptick in murders and assaults of elderly family members.

Japan is looking for a solution. But its shrinking population offers little optimism for its older members.

Japanese culture has built-in protections for the elderly. That culture reveres its ancestors, its predecessors. If violence against the elderly happens in a culture where they are revered, what will happen to our older members in a Western culture that has no such leanings?

What will happen is what is currently happening in many of our schools. The weak and the different are singled out for torture. The torture often leads to suicide. The worst tormenters even encourage their victims to it–retroactive abortion by peers, as it were.

A couple of generations after Roe, the idea that the strong can decide what life should be for the weak is not legal but it is becoming normalized.

There is little regard for those who are different because there is little regard for life itself.

The slope is a slow slide. And we don’t realize while we’re sliding through the ride that it only leads to the bottom.

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Comments

wsucram15 Added Jun 13, 2017 - 6:11pm
Believe me..you have found the RIGHT audience for this piece.  Most people on here, NOT ALL, but most would see the weak dead before helping lending a helping hand or spending one penny to help.
Leroy Added Jun 13, 2017 - 6:14pm
I lived in cultural where abortion was commonplace.  Combine that with a one-child policy and it gets ugly.  Everyone wants to have the perfect child.  In rural areas, the perfect child is male.  Female babies are frequently aborted or thrown away.  If there is any hint that the baby won't be perfect, it is aborted.  Not so much today, but in the past, a mother with a second child would be forced to have an abortion, often in unpleasant conditions.  My wife's father served time in prison until relatives could pay a fine.  I have a very wonderful sister-in-law.
 
A foreign colleague proudly announced that his wife was pregnant with their fourth child.  A local nonchalantly asked, "Will you cancel the baby?"
 
The doctor congratulates me, "You have a healthy son."  He tells my wife she should have an abortion.  Why?  Because she has an inexplicable rash on her fingers.  My wife begs me to have an abortion and says we will try again.
 
Her parents ask her about me.  She tells them I had a beer a few nights before.  They tell her that the child will be retarded and she should have an abortion.  The rule is no alcohol three months prior to conception.  At every meal, the conversation was about just how retarded our child would be.  The intent was to pressure me into letting my wife have an abortion.  All signs were that the fetus was healthy.  It's an ugly thing when it is up close and personal.
wsucram15 Added Jun 13, 2017 - 6:27pm
I know, I could tell you all about it, from a medical standpoint.  But it is still a slippery slope to not helping others..  It really is Leroy.
Leroy Added Jun 13, 2017 - 6:42pm
I don't quite understand, WSU.  I wish that you would elaborate.  Do you mean that we complain about it but do nothing to help?
Mircea Negres Added Jun 13, 2017 - 6:52pm
Nice post, Nancy. I have a different perspective, however. First, I'd probably have shot Baby Doe's parents in the esophagus before allowing that child to die such a horrible death. The weak can be a pain in the nether regions, but I believe it is the duty of the strong or willing to help or protect them. Abuse of the elderly happens in other cultures too, besides the Japanese. Just google how elderly are abused, robbed, raped and murdered in South Africa- often by their grandchildren, but I strongly recommend at least a couple of barf bags.
 
The availability of abortion has nothing to do with it and built in systemic protections for the elderly mean nothing. It's about weaklings and cowards picking on such targets because others would kick their teeth in. The weak and the different would not be tortured if the strong or the moral among you would find some testicular fortitude to tackle such nonsense wherever it happened, but no, most would rather read about another bullying victim suicide or school mass shooting instead. It all comes down to one unpleasant thing- social decay.
 
Then there's the matter of abortion and making contraceptives illegal. If you want to know what damage that stupid idea caused, look no further than documentaries on Youtube about children in Romanian orphanages shortly after the fall of communism. Nicolae Ceausescu made abortion and contraceptives illegal. It led to thousands, if not tens of thousands of children abandoned to the less than tender mercies of orphanages whose personnel either couldn't or wouldn't deal with them. Justice? There's no such thing as justice. There's only whatever the strong say is just, that's it, because sure as hell the weak don't make the rules...  
Jeff Michka Added Jun 13, 2017 - 7:12pm
wsucram15 correctly sez: Most people on here, NOT ALL, but most would see the weak dead before helping lending a helping hand or spending one penny to help. - The WB rightists and anti-choice people would rather die than help someone in need, and Ms. Head is undoubtedly one of the folks who really are more for prohibiting sex, than really concerned about unborn children.  Lately, walking by the weekly (their day is Tuesday) "pro-lifer protesters" at the local Planned Parenthood, asked several how many "unwanted" children they'd adopted, and got just "they shouldn't have sex if they didn't want children," and of course not one had adopted anything, although one woman told me she'd "rescued a cat."  hmmm.  once again, it's not about children, it's about "those people" having sex.
Don Turnblade Added Jun 13, 2017 - 11:34pm
It is sad that such bad things happened in the Philippines and yet so strange that the Philippines still does not favor abortion and has a really low opinions of back alley medical degrees.  The Philippines does not really blame the Catholic church for these unsafe abortions, they blame two groups.  One, the Philippines had a serious fake doctor problem.  Telling people how to try really dangerous abortion tactics.  Two, a woman is supposed to show some good judgement.  Strange how the abortion movement is free to make justification cases from other countries as if it expects that anyone who does not see it there way has never traveled internationally.  
 
Don Turnblade Added Jun 13, 2017 - 11:48pm
Another point.  The foster parent system benefits hugely from child friendly volunters.  One may argue that they are compensated, but not at the rate needed to pay for foster parenting as a career or job.  Having been trained and licensed, these are not in as simple a position to adopt as one may suppose.  Fake arguments that if the pro-life side has not adopted then they would not even if it were practicle shows logical weakness of such an argument.  Having experience providing a foster home, even with a preferential track to adopt after more than a years worth of training and licensing, the matter is not like buying a child a set of clothes at wallmart.  It might be more logical to ask a pro-life advocate if they have donated any goods or time to a crisis pregnancy center.  If a mother chooses not to abort but still is distressed or under prepared, such support is helpful both for the mother and the new born child.
 
 
Patrick Writes Added Jun 14, 2017 - 1:43am
There are few countries in the world with abortion on demand. In England, the woman has to convince her GP that the pregnancy would have a detrimental effect on her mental health. If she is successful, then the GP refers and the national health service usually pays for it up to 24 weeks.
 
In Australia and New Zealand, the national health service doesn't always pay for it (usually goes along the lines of if the woman can't convince her GP that there is a medical reason why she can't have the child, the national health service doesn't pay and she usually has the child).
 
 
France does have 'abortion on demand' though, to my knowledge (only in the last decade). 
 
The hysteria out of the U.S. on the Left about abortion being a basic human right which has to be fully funded by taxpayers is often a lot of hot air. Few countries allow a woman to stroll into provider and stroll out, easier than getting her nails done. 
Even A Broken Clock Added Jun 14, 2017 - 9:55am
I support Planned Parenthood and donate financially to it.
Micahel Dolan Added Jun 14, 2017 - 10:00am
Making a profit for killing the baby-is Evil Planned Parent-Hood had as its leader a racist lunatic who wanted abortions on black babies. Margret Sanger a full blown lunatic- kill the black babies.
wsucram15 Added Jun 14, 2017 - 10:05am
First let me say that I agree with this statement, "There is no ONE answer that fits all. And NO legislation or Totalitarian regime will stop abortion."
To Leroy..well from personal experience and that of the adoptive process of my BF (who adopted handicapped children), I do believe that if you can avoid pain and suffering you should.  If it is positive this will occur..not by superstition but reality.
Abortion is NOT a simple process, nor does the scar go away to the woman who has this done.  Keeping it simple, I have a disability and at the time medical science is not where it is today.  I had many problems that were severe and the doctors recommended at around 6 months that I abort my child due to the probability of damage to the fetus.  The procedure didnt work correctly and I delivered the fetus myself in the bathroom.  It was horrible  and needless to say, I dont recommend late term abortions unless there is a disability. In fact, Im really against it...
I dont recommend abortions freely but I live with a disability and I would not wish that on anyone.  Its not fair to limit a child before they have had a chance to live a life.  There is a horrible feeling you get when you are told that your life is now restricted but a child born with a disability knows nothing different  However, the feeling of separation and being alone has to be intensified. 
Understanding medical perspective over a selfish need to have a child, is important when it comes to a disability. Thats not an insult  its just my personal experience.
 
Now on the comment I made..I can honestly say, that helping people less fortunate, are in poverty, especially as they age and cannot care for themselves is NOT a highly supported topic on this page.   Its disgusting.  So to have the viewpoint of anti-abortion of anyone, let alone children born from addicts or with disabilities and not wanting to care to the sick is contradictory.
Leroy Added Jun 14, 2017 - 10:30am
WSU, I am saddened by your experience.  It must have been horrific.
 
I don't like the idea of abortion, but I can accept it up to a point.  I don't agree with abortion on demand under any and all circumstances.  Accidental pregnancies happen.  Birth defects happen.  Some women can't deal with the idea of giving birth to a child who will suffer in life.  I can understand that.  They should understand that they should act as early as possible, and after a certain level of development, there should be no choice.  The man should have a choice in the matter as well.
wsucram15 Added Jun 14, 2017 - 1:26pm
I agree and my husband was a part of that decision, although not present during the process. 
Many years later with a much better doctor and improvements in medicine, I had a son, under great protest,  I still spent time in the hospital and on bed rest, although not as much.  I was much more active during that time.
 
BUT, I can tell you that both of my children have been checked for my disability and only my son is suspect of a minor form.  My concern is with their children.  I had surgery shortly after my son, no more kids.  I dont think I should have had children, I am firm in my belief of that, you dont need to be perfect, but illness is genetic and its unfair to pass that along. 
 
I love kids, I just dont like to see them suffer.  I have seen wayyy too much of that with kids along with disabilities and things like addiction.  I cannot tell you how many kids I have worked with to understand the addiction of a parent (even though its often blamed on them) is NOt their fault or kids with disabilities becuase of a drug addicted mother.  One boy was being beaten in the ribs by his father who was on crack I believe and I had to (along with some neighborhood boys) pull him off and threaten the police.   We took the boy to the hospital and called his drunken mom, at least she came so he could get treatment.   Some people just dont deserve kids...that boy is a heroin addict right now.  His only sane link was his mom, who died and he turned to drugs...could not help him.
The abuse, neglect and illness is endless and LEROY, people not only dont want to help..but they dont want to hear about it.   Its sad.
Nancy E Head Added Jun 14, 2017 - 4:18pm
Thanks for all the comments! Just a few general replies.
No one wants to see anyone suffer. Christians need to open our hearts and our homes to people in distress. That's what the crisis pregnancy effort helps us do.
Someone brought contraceptives into the discussion. Most pro-life people aren't into outlawing contraceptives that are truly contraceptive rather than abortifacient.
And we need to remember that legalized abortion was supposed to end back alley butchering. It hasn't. 
It hasn't. 
Also remember that legalized abortion was going to end child abuse. That was almost a promise back in the day.
Again, it hasn't.
Legalized abortion was America selling our soul and getting the usual in return from the devil. More devilry. 
 
Thanks again for reading and all the great discussion!
God bless you, every one.
 
The Objective Observer Added Jun 14, 2017 - 4:57pm
I have a piece in my head that I want to write. "Abolitionists vs. Abortionists". The basic concept is that today we all understand the utter brutality and inhumanity of slavery but before the Civil War there was a large segment of the population that thought it was OK. I believe that future generations will look back on today with the same abject horror and wonder how in the world we could be so barbaric.
Nancy E Head Added Jun 14, 2017 - 5:55pm
More than a decade ago, I was sitting in a graduate English class listening to a discussion of Uncle Tom's Cabin by some very feminist fellow students. I leaned over to the man next to me.
"It's just like today."
Without missing a beat, he said, "You mean abortion?"
It's interesting to note that he is Muslim. He easily saw what was more than a dense fog to the young Americans in class. 
Government legalizing the oppression of the weak by the strong--declaring humans to be unhuman--deja vu all over again.
Jeff Michka Added Jun 14, 2017 - 7:20pm
Wow, ol Nancy can use a delete key faster than a "right to lifer" can take away a mother's foodstamps and healthcare.  Did like the right to lifers"="We're really against those people having sex," eh?  Says volumes, along with this "Uncle Tom's Cabin" nonsense.
Nancy E Head Added Jun 14, 2017 - 8:02pm
Don't get the reference to delete key. I didn't delete anything.
Uncle Tom was assigned reading. So I suppose your beef about the book is actually with the professor. 
Years before grad school, I was once a young woman in a crisis pregnancy. I've been on that road myself. 
Eleven years later, I was a single mother of five children. For some time, we were on food stamps. I've never asserted that mothers in crisis shouldn't have food stamps.
I do remember a time that we couldn't get food stamps and were relying on friends and church members for help. Bureaucracy is not a cure all.
If not for the kindness of people around us--who coincidentally happened to be pro-life--my now grown kids would have suffered more than they did.  
Just as all pro-life people don't want to outlaw true contraceptives, not all pro-life people want to outlaw food stamps. I don't know any who do.
And the guy who runs our local food pantry? Pro-life. We like to help others. And sometimes we want to help because we've know need ourselves.
Jeff Jackson Added Jun 15, 2017 - 1:00am
Let’s talk about another slippery slope. The legal reason that the Supreme Court of the United States ruled for abortion in the decision Roe Vs Wade was because there is no agreement, no consensus just exactly when life begins. Biologically, philosophically, medically, and religiously there is no consensus. I won’t get into those theories, because that is a book in itself. But if we take the religious view, life begins at conception. Understand that the people who wrote the scriptures really had no idea of the mechanics of how or when life began, and sperm, eggs, and all of that chemistry was not in their scientific knowledge at the time. If we take the religious view, then we are, in effect, imposing a religious view upon citizens who may not share that religious view. This is my position on abortion. We cannot force people (women) to have babies when they do not share the religious belief that the law would be imposing upon them. The U.S. Constitution states that “Congress shall make no law regarding the establishment of religion,” and imposing the religious belief of when life begins would be establishing  just that upon women who may not hold that religious conviction.
The humane reason. The Supreme Court of the United States ruled that no consensus meant they had to allow abortion. Consider stem-cell research. We have the tools to create solutions for many ailments if we use “human tissue.” I watched an uncle die of ALS. I cannot in any way rationalize not attempting to solve this disease which causes unbearable suffering if we regard some cells in a test tube a “human being” and thus discard the research towards a solution.
The contraceptive reason. The other slippery slope is with contraception itself. The IUD (Intrauterine Device) form of birth control does not (as I understand it) prevent fertilization; it only prevents the embryo from planting in the uterus.  If we claim that life begins at conception, the IUD would not be allowed, since we took the religious position that life begins at conception, and therefore the IUD is taking a life. Please understand that I do not think abortion is a good thing to do, but I also do not think that forcing a woman to bear a child that will be abused and neglected and end up with a miserable life is a good thing either. It is a hard decision for a woman, but in the end, under certain circumstances, it is for the better.
I would like to see all of the people against abortion adopt all of the unwanted babies in the world. The convenience of insisting a woman bear an unwanted child because of personal religious beliefs is not what the United States calls fair laws not based on a religious view. As well, dictating what a woman does with her doctor is imposing the law on an intimate matter where the law has no place. Again, I am not a fan of abortion, I just cannot rationalize it constitutionally. I respect your beliefs, but please do not attempt to impose your religious beliefs on me.
John G Added Jun 15, 2017 - 2:44am
Writes .In Australia and New Zealand, the national health service doesn't always pay for it (usually goes along the lines of if the woman can't convince her GP that there is a medical reason why she can't have the child, the national health service doesn't pay and she usually has the child).
Absolute bollocks.
John G Added Jun 15, 2017 - 2:46am
Wsucram Most people on here, NOT ALL, but most would see the weak dead before helping lending a helping hand or spending one penny to help.
You can say that again. What a bunch of mean spirited authoritarians populate this place.
Patrick Writes Added Jun 15, 2017 - 3:01am
New Zealand: 
 
"Abortion is covered by laws that have not been updated for 40 years. They say that two consultants need to agree that the woman's mental or physical health is at risk or the baby would be seriously disabled before an abortion can be approved." 
 
http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/opinion/90539750/editorial-is-it-time-to-update-new-zealands-abortion-law
 
-- In practice it appears that physicians often just sign off on mental health grounds. 
 
Australia: 
 
Depends on the state but in all but Victoria (who just changed in 2008) they have stipulations around mental or physical health of mother being a factor in obtaining an abortion. But all states require 2 practitioners to agree that the woman is able to have an abortion before referral to get one. 
 
http://theconversation.com/explainer-is-abortion-legal-in-australia-48321
John G Added Jun 15, 2017 - 3:03am
And in neither country is an abortion ever refused.
You don't know what you're talking about. 
I live here.
Patrick Writes Added Jun 15, 2017 - 3:04am
Some make common arguments about the terrible situation if abortions were made illegal in U.S.A. That's never going to happen. Most people just want late term abortions made illegal (where the fetus at that state could grow into a health person) and no public funds used for them. 
Nancy E Head Added Jun 15, 2017 - 8:44am
The pro-life cause has gained ground in the US by changing hearts more than changing laws. That's why abortion numbers are down.
Help is available. And many women don't feel alone and desperate.
Many have abortions who feel there is no help, no other option. When we show them other options, they often choose.
We shall see if abortion can become like smoking. Something that was commonly accepted but much rarer because we understand the downsides of it now. 
 
Dino Manalis Added Jun 15, 2017 - 9:55am
I don't like abortions, but it's ultimately the woman's choice, sometimes women have abortions on their own.  It's not an easy decision.  Planned Parenthood should have more strings attached to make it family-friendly.
Billy Roper Added Jun 15, 2017 - 12:15pm
Yes, the slippery slope is true of abortion "rights" just as it is true for gay "rights", as homosexual activists are now working to lower ages of consent and mainstream pedosexuality.
wsucram15 Added Jun 15, 2017 - 2:00pm
John G..oh I know, I have been on here a long time and watched its decline.  Im not even sure its a writers page anymore...it used to be some time ago. Most of the writers on here that actually wrote articles left.  I think the only original authors are SEF, myself and Expat from around the time the site went up.  But not sure, sometimes the longtime writers pop in and visit.
Now its more of an opinions column page or bashing each other, not my thing.
 
Nancy..I believe a woman should have the right to chose until the second trimester, after that unless there are medical issues or a rape involved, it should not be allowed.
Patrick Writes Added Jun 15, 2017 - 3:05pm
@John G - Surely then you understand that the laws on the books is not abortion on demand which was my point. If you have to hide behind 'mental health' and other such reasons, it's because politicians likely don't want to touch this issue. That was my point. It's nearly universal that abortion is seen as a necessary evil. 
Nancy E Head Added Jun 15, 2017 - 7:37pm
Several points to make at this point:
1. There waiting lists to adopt infants are vast.
2. This issue isn't religious for most people. And the evidence is that support for abortion--the kind of support that says, yes, I'll have one of those--has fallen among the non-religious.
I have serious religious convictions and they apply to this issue. But it is an issue of justice. Just as slavery is injustice, so is abortion.
3. Why the second trimester? What magically happens to an embryo in one day that changes him or her into a life of value. That's the slope. A sliding scale on which we are all in danger of being declared unworthy of life.
 
Billy Roper Added Jun 16, 2017 - 10:48am
Liberals are now trying to use the slippery slope to normalize beastiality, and have 8 year old kids dress up in drag.
Jeffrey Kelly Added Jul 10, 2017 - 11:51pm
LOL, Billy goes off the rails....again.
 
On-topic, though, I'm philosophically pro-choice but the reality is I couldn't imagine wanting my wife to have an abortion.
 
Sometime ago after our second son was born my wife asked me out of the blue what would I want to do if she became pregnant again.  I told her, without hesitation, that I would want to keep the baby.  She told me she felt relieved by that.
 
I think a lot of this should be dealt with in a realistic manner by teaching children about safe sex but also making sure they learn about the emotional cost of having sex too early.