Hurricane Harvey, go away

My Recent Posts

Here's hoping Hurricane Harvey soon moves on and leaves the stricken residents of Texas and Louisiana alone.

From what I've been able to gather, Harvey isn't all that different from other very strong hurricanes of the past, which is like saying being mauled by a 950 pound grizzly bear isn't all that different from being mauled by a 925 pound grizzly bear. But unlike past hurricanes, it's been stalled by other weather patterns; in the time Harvey has been hovering over the coast, Katrina had already made its way inland to Indiana.

50 inches of rain forecast. I mean, 50 inches of snow qualifies for an "I survived the blizzard of ..." t-shirt. That's, what ... five inches of rain, give or take?

And so ... record rains. I don't have to tell anyone how bad things are down there, and North Korea's attempts to help by firing rockets at it have so far had little effect. For those of you in the path of this apocalyptic shower, I can only say that we're all thinking of you, and hoping you'll dry out soon. Keep your spirits up ... another thing easier said than done.

Comments

Ari Silverstein Added Aug 30, 2017 - 12:04pm
Interesting comment about the remnants of Katrina being all the way Indiana by this time and Harvey still lingering in the impact zone.  What a mess.  I wonder what humans were thinking when we decided to build our civilizations near the coasts.  Perhaps if it weren’t for Federal Aid to rebuild these people would re-establish further inland?
Pbier Added Aug 30, 2017 - 3:24pm
Unfortunately we must expect more of these extreme weather events and climate change increases. If Trump had not withdrawn from the symbolic Paris agreement this may never have happened.
John Minehan Added Aug 30, 2017 - 4:43pm
"I wonder what humans were thinking when we decided to build our civilizations near the coasts.  Perhaps if it weren’t for Federal Aid to rebuild these people would re-establish further inland? "
 
That was asked after Katrina . . . and quickly hushed up . . . but remains a question that is worth asking. 
Jenifer Frost Added Aug 30, 2017 - 5:01pm
Civilization in the past established cities by the coastal regions to further shipping and trade, as well as travel. Today this is fairly unnecessary. And when the sea levels rise it will be unsustainable. 
 
But for now, indeed, like it's namesake Steve Harvey, let's hope Harvey just goes away. He is pointless and offensive. The hurricane is not much better. 
Mark Hunter Added Aug 31, 2017 - 12:46am
Ari, I know why people originally built along the coast -- that's where the easiest ways to travel and trade were, not to mention the fish. And they've been getting flooded out every since.
Mark Hunter Added Aug 31, 2017 - 12:49am
After Katrina, I wrote a column in which I suggested it would be safer and cheaper in the long run to move the entire city of New Orleans to higher ground. One reader responded by calling me a racist. Apparently I hate black people, because I thought helping to make the population of a city safer would be a good thing.
wsucram15 Added Aug 31, 2017 - 2:23am
MArk..
Katrina was very sad, I know some of the survivors and in fact over the years two of my best friends were relocated from Katrina.  One just moved back home as did her sister.  At one time the entire family lived there.  The media stories and tv shows just dont match the stories.  
There is a cajun restaurant here..and the chef/owner is of course from NOLA, relocated after Katrina. Makes some really good gumbo.
 
Anyway..the storm over Texas isnt like most hurricanes, in fact supposedly the two competing weather systems SE-SW that stalled it coupled with the warm water and cooler air above made this like another hurricane in hondoras in 98 I think, supposedly it killed 7,000 people.   I dont think the US has had one like this before.
 
At the end of the day though..even with the extreme weather, this is a man made disaster. This is NOT the first hurricane and/or flooding in Houston.  You cannot put people in old infrastructure, cheaply built housing, low lying areas, near severe weather patterns.   The same thing happened in California and with Katrina.
 
You cannot build cheap houses at sea level and sell them to people and make flood insurance ridiculous to buy.  Thats what happens. The people lose, they get pennies on the dollar.  The state or county rebuilds and it begins all over.
 
 
Mark Hunter Added Aug 31, 2017 - 2:49am
I remember that Hondorus hurricane--Mitch. Another slow mover; there have been a few like that nearer the USA, that moved very slowly or even circled around on themselves; but they never hovered close to the coast in a way that allowed them to pick up the ocean moisture and dump it over land for such long periods. When huge amounts of rain get dumped over water, it doesn't tend to get noticed as much.
 
But your point is taken on the housing situation. The deadliest natural disaster in US history was a hurricane that hit Texas and took out the city of Galveston--seems we haven't learned our century old lessons.
Dr. Rupert Green Added Aug 31, 2017 - 11:02am
@ Mark. For those of you in the path of this apocalyptic shower, I can only say that we're all thinking of you, and hoping you'll dry out soon. Keep your spirits up ... another thing easier said than done."
 
Your words are kind and welcoming, and the ones needed now.  Here are my words. Can you mount a similar response? 
Jenifer Frost Added Aug 31, 2017 - 4:39pm
Cheap coastal housing and overpriced flood insurance isn't an accident or coincidence. It's called capitalizing on others misfortunes for greeds sake. Also known simply as Capitalism. 
Mark Hunter Added Aug 31, 2017 - 6:17pm
I'm sorry, Dr. Green, but your link is broken somewhere along the way.
Dr. Rupert Green Added Aug 31, 2017 - 10:07pm
True on link. Antumn deleted the post.  Hope here is good
John G Added Sep 1, 2017 - 11:34pm
As it happens, Harvey has killed an estimated 44 Texans and forced some 32,000 into shelterssince it struck, a week ago. That is a catastrophe for every one of those individuals, of course. Still, those figures look small alongside the havoc wreaked by flooding across southern Asia during the very same period. In the past few days, more than 1,200 people have been killed, and the lives of some 40 million others turned upside down, by torrential rain in northern India, southern Nepal, northern Bangladesh and southern Pakistan.
Mark Hunter Added Sep 2, 2017 - 9:55pm
That link isn't working either, Doc. But who knows, it may be me -- I'm kind of in an internet black hole right now.
Mark Hunter Added Sep 2, 2017 - 10:02pm
The tragedy of human nature--the deaths in your own country, region, town, get all the attention, even when still bigger tragedies happen elsewhere.