The Deep State's Dereliction of Duty

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Many organizations and institutions have to face change or suffer extinction. There are, of course, those who are seeking change claiming that their mission is, in fact, the will of God. The folks who are crusading in a certain part of the world, to establish another theocracy, are in my opinion wrong on two parts: One, claiming that they know the will of God is rather pretentious on their part, and two, it would seem that if God wanted all of those folks mutilated and beheaded, He is God, and I’m pretty sure if He wanted people dead He could accomplish that. I seem to recall a Sodom and Gomorrah whose sinful cities were obliterated some time ago. If I was an insurance salesman in Las Vegas, that would be part of my sales pitch. Governments have faded into history because they weren’t willing to recognize change, to adapt to it, and accept it. Consider what the print media has faced in the Information Age. Newspapers and magazines are struggling to survive, because it will be their death if they cannot change in the competitive world of instant information and the 24-hour news cycle. Of course, the ease of access to the internet has facilitated terabytes of fake news and misinformation. The biases of the almost extinct print media look like typos compared to some of the fake news and misinformation that you can find on the internet.  

 

Many institutions “lose their mission,” they lose sight of their original purpose, or their people stagnate and miss critical opportunities that change offers. Organizations deal with the aforementioned challenges by either changing leadership and releasing employees, or by bringing in consultants to effect and initiate change. Consultants, because of their objectivity, are valuable, as well as their disinterest in the politics of the organization. There is always, of course, the fear and resistance to change, no matter who is leading it. Resistance to change can take many forms, including open criticism by those who you thought were allies, to deliberate sabotage in the execution of planned change.

 

I have written at length about the deep state and the vested political class with their ambitions to preserve themselves even to the detriment of their constituents. I think political analyst Rush Limbaugh has hit the key issue. What if Trump’s policies succeed? What if a Washington outsider changes everything, or even a few things? The Republicans recognized immediately after the 2016 election the opportunity that they had been given, and yet not months into their terms, Republicans began to defect from supporting the proposals and the agenda of the president. The Washington outsiders who populate the Trump cabinet have come under harsh criticism, and some of their backgrounds are, shall we say, questionable. If it turns out that key members of Trump’s cabinet are removed because of sloppy vetting, then certainly Trump is open to criticism for poor choices, but then, Trump is a Washington outsider, isn’t he?  The people he has populated his cabinet with are, for the most part, not Washington insiders, nor could they be considered members of the deep state.

 

The danger to the deep state, the political class, is the possibility that someone who was a Washington outsider, though well-known, came to Washington and changed things that the political class couldn’t do. All of the years in government, all of the credentials, the promises, the obvious concessions to large campaign contributors of the deep state political class will mean nothing. The ineffectiveness of the political class is under scrutiny, and they’re getting uncomfortable. The only option for them now is to resist as much as they can. The resistance of the Republicans is harming the party, but to the members of the deep state, self-preservation is the number one priority. The bottom line: they cannot afford to let Trump succeed.  

 

The deep state cannot allow an outsider to successfully change the U.S. government. The Mexican wall is a reaction to the incompetence of allowing 11 million illegals into this country, an unprecedented failure with no one coming forth and claiming responsibility, nor anyone insisting that the inept managers be fired. The falling or nonexistent wages of the middle class has created a national debt that keeps accumulating with no end in sight. I could go on, but suffice to say there are plenty of problems that could be addressed, that aren’t, and if a Washington outsider were to make a dent in any of these problems, it sure would make the deep state bureaucrats uncomfortable. The answer is fairly simple. The deep state political elite Washington insiders cannot allow an outsider to best them, lest they be revealed for what they are: incompetent over-promising windbags that take our money, live comfortable lives, and promise they will do something if they’re re-elected. Donald Trump was elected as an outsider who promised change; now that it appears as if he really meant that, the deep state people have to resist with all they can muster. His success is their demise.

Comments

George N Romey Added Nov 25, 2017 - 7:09pm
Good article Jeff. My belief is that Deep State will do anything to retain power over the people. They killed JFK and have started unjust wars and conflicts. To rid ourselves of these rich elites will be nothing less than revolution.
Dino Manalis Added Nov 25, 2017 - 7:22pm
When the president succeeds, we all succeed!
Jeff Jackson Added Nov 25, 2017 - 7:56pm
Well George, I kinda hope not, because when you look at revolutions, few of them turn out the way they were planned.
Jeff Jackson Added Nov 25, 2017 - 7:56pm
Dino, I hope this president is looking out for our interests.
Jeff Michka Added Nov 25, 2017 - 8:18pm
Ah, Jackson, you've embraced the Deep State and Deep Staters again.  Geo R and his ilk must be delighted with a bolster to their saggy, do-nothing brand of deep state political action.  If you read Geo, the deep state is his excuse for surrendering.  Not very impressive.  I'm sure "doing nothing" is rather comforting.  The last thing you'll ever see is Geo Romey leading a revolution.  The last thing you'll see deep staters do is anything that might end "the grand Deep State Conspiracy."
Flying Junior Added Nov 26, 2017 - 1:40am
The deep state political elite Washington insiders cannot allow an outsider to best them, lest they be revealed for what they are: incompetent over-promising windbags that take our money, live comfortable lives, and promise they will do something if they’re re-elected.
 
So these elected officials you speak of and perhaps their allies in D.C. constitute only a small part of the Deep State, right?  It has to be bigger than just the members of congress and their backers.  Is the Deep State republican, democratic or non-partisan?
 
Isn't the closest reality that resembles this myth of the Deep State just unknown forces within the Pentagon coupled with powerful lobbying interests and party political bosses?  Surely there is no actual Deep State that reigns unswervingly as would  a monarch or oligarchy?  You guys are thinking of the Illuminati.  I acknowledge that there will always be power behind the elected officials; men that put in place the puppets and pull the strings like a puppeteer, but to my knowledge, the only real deep state is the almighty dollar.
Jeff Jackson Added Nov 26, 2017 - 7:02am
Junior: So these elected officials you speak of and perhaps their allies in D.C. constitute only a small part of the Deep State, right? Wrong. The deep state spans all parties. Short definition: The deep state is elected representatives who protect the interests of their campaign donors more than than, and to the detriment of their constituents, and the appointed bureaucrats who do the same. The deep state allowed 11 million illegals to enter the U.S. The deep state bails out banks and financial institutions who make bad bets but want to remain rich and powerful, and the deep state facilitates that position.
George N Romey Added Nov 26, 2017 - 7:33am
The Deep State is all about money and with it power.
Dave Volek Added Nov 26, 2017 - 10:51am
Jeff
The deep state spans all parties. Short definition: The deep state is elected representatives who protect the interests of their campaign donors more than than, and to the detriment of their constituents, and the appointed bureaucrats who do the same.
 
Then the next logical step is to develop a system of governance that does not have political parties, right? 
 
 
 
 
 
 
opher goodwin Added Nov 26, 2017 - 12:50pm
Dino - in this case if the President succeeds the planet is fucked and the rich carry off the spoils. Can't see how that can possibly be everyone winning?
opher goodwin Added Nov 26, 2017 - 12:52pm
Jeff/George - I'll leave god to one side - where all such manufactured concepts reside - the rich and powerful pull all the strings. It is time for some scissors.
Jeff Jackson Added Nov 26, 2017 - 1:09pm
Dave, actually, if the political parties did what they are supposed to do, which is represent the people, they could be the ones that hold representatives of this democracy accountable and responsible. At present time, they are active participants in the deep state, with their handing out favors, appointments, and doing more for their large contributors than their voting constituencies.
mark henry smith Added Nov 26, 2017 - 2:36pm
For all of the claims of incompetence, your article is an affirmation of the success of their agenda. They are beyond the legal system, beyond the basic rules of the economic system, beyond the reach of the tax system. They can say whatever lies serve their purposes and rely on a media system to promote their lies.
 
Busing for integration was a lie. It was not to benefit students, but the automotive industry. And we could go on and on about one social program after another ending up with the health care debacle. If you look at the trickle-down benefits that result to the citizens and consumers, and compare them to the benefits to the industries that supported and promoted the legislations, you begin to see just how manipulative these hegemonious corporate monsters have become.
 
They are the feared octopus of which numerous thinkers have warned, a huge feeding machine that is beyond the understanding of most citizens who live their lives being suckered by its tentacles. Thanks Jeff     
George N Romey Added Nov 26, 2017 - 6:08pm
Sometimes you have to chop off a few heads but you might get something worse. Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Franklin for all their many warts designed something better than a monarchy. The US got lucky once but again?
Jeff Jackson Added Nov 26, 2017 - 6:38pm
Thanks Mark. We have to consider what the U.S. would be like if the major corporations had never existed. We still live in a prosperous nation, when compared to others in the world, and certainly, looking back pretty far, we would have been enslaved by our adversaries some time ago. But we also have to consider that  Americans  gave their last full measure of devotion to get us, and keep us, where we are in the world, a nation that few have the nerve to attack, and the ones that did or try suffered and will suffer terribly. What is most disturbing about all of it is, again, the price the American people pay.
It is pretty clear that the opportunities that America offers corporations, and the wealthy, could not occur without the sacrifices Americans have made and continue to make. The deep state and all of its cronies need to realize that they are where they are by their own efforts, yes, but also due to citizens willing and able to defend the rights that they possess. The unequal privileges that the deep state offers their financiers is deeply disrespectful to the American population, without whom they would have nothing.
Jeff Jackson Added Nov 26, 2017 - 6:48pm
Yes, George, take a look at the French Revolution, and you will see utter chaos that followed what was originally a great idea. They executed 1400 people in one year, and the madness set it and the blood ran until no one was safe. It was a minor disaster, attempting to implement a revolution much like the American Revolution. Revolutions get out of hand quickly. Think of all the fake news and misinformation that Americans consider facts, and you would have a population that through nothing but confusion, would incarcerate or execute people who are the best chance of success. 
One of the best profs I had gave a lecture on a revolution, with no recording devices allowed. The big lessons of the lecture, never kill the really smart people, and realize that a revolution will make you vulnerable. I am not looking for the latest African revolution to go well, even though I thought Mugabe should have been ousted some time ago. Maybe I'm just pessimistic, but after studying the revolutions in history, nothing ever comes out as planned, and a lot of people who could do the people good end up being sacrificed.
Dave Volek Added Nov 27, 2017 - 12:33am
Jeff
How can political parties represent their constituents when their constituents are so divided?
 
Unless a specific constituency (or congress district as you Americans call it) votes overwhelmingly for a political party, we can say the constituency is just as divided after the election as before. When a politician says "polls of my constituency told me to vote this way", he probably just asked his friends. And there would be a lot of people in the constituency who think similarly to his friends, so the politician would be correct that he voted according to the wishes of his constituents.
 
I could go on about this social force, but I think it is more important to realize that politicians work first for their political party, not the society they govern. If you believe there is a magic wand that can change that, I say good luck. Your great-grandkids will still be looking for it.
 
 
 
 
Mircea Negres Added Nov 27, 2017 - 3:04am
Good article, Jeff. I'd like to point out two things. First, whenever God needed killing done, he sent angels. Second, it seems to me what we call Deep State is much like the Russian Mafia- not a group, but a collection of individuals and groups with their own agendas and interests who join and separate as need dictates.   
wsucram15 Added Nov 27, 2017 - 10:47am
"the rich and powerful pull all the strings. It is time for some scissors."
Opher..just letting you know..Im stealing that line.  Great!
 
Dave you are naive...its not the political party they represent. That is a thinly veiled facade. They represent the highest bidder, period.
George N Romey Added Nov 27, 2017 - 12:27pm
The rich own this system and they will kill to maintain it. 
wsucram15 Added Nov 27, 2017 - 1:53pm
Yes George they will and they can do it legally.
Mike Haluska Added Nov 27, 2017 - 2:41pm
Jeff - terrific article!
 
The Founding Fathers knew that the larger government grew, the more dangerous and self-serving it became.  Jefferson said it best:
 
"The two enemies of the people are criminals and government, so let us tie the second down with the chains of the Constitution so the second will not become the legalized version of the first."
mark henry smith Added Nov 27, 2017 - 3:22pm
Jeff, excellent retort. And to all who have commented.
 
Mike, damn you, you are right on again. When the criminals run the government the laws become criminal acts against the people, common sense, and the future. I always say, no one would ever eat babies unless the super wealthy decided they tasted good.
 
And revolutions are notoriously unfair affairs where the best and the brightest get swallowed by the powerful and ruthless. Jeanne is right. The only difference in the agendas of the two parties is percentage points on most things, and talking points meant to stimulate emotional voting. How many anti-abortion politicians are the ones convincing their mistresses to have abortions? Wait, how many who support the defense of marriage act are out cheating on their wife?
 
If hypocrisy was a rash, wouldn't you love to see who's scratching? Don't you think there would be a whole lot of scratching going on in the health suites of Washington, DC and in state houses around the country?  
Leroy Added Nov 27, 2017 - 6:26pm
You can bet that neither party will be derelict in their duties to surveil American citizens.  You can bet that they won't waste time reauthorizing "Title VII of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA)."  If Congress does one this session, this will be it.
Dave Volek Added Nov 27, 2017 - 9:08pm
wsuscam15
 
Dave you are naive...its not the political party they represent. That is a thinly veiled facade. They represent the highest bidder, period.
 
However you want to interpret this symbiotic relationship between the parties and their donors is fine by me. Back in my political days, a knew of a company that donated $30,000 to a political party, then got a $150,000 job creation grant two years later. It did not create new jobs: this company was only replacing workers moving through its doors.
 
If we don't like this relationship, then we need to build a system that does not have political parties.
 
 
 
 
Jeff Jackson Added Nov 27, 2017 - 10:21pm
In a very recent explanation, one of the people who didn't think allowing the super-rich to donate in the Citizens United Supreme Court case changed his mind after reading the opinion of the court. Free speech means just that, according to the interpretation of the Supreme Court. When the Republicans and Democrats see enough people leaving their parties, they adopt the ideas of the third parties, and this has happened for a long time. I'm not happy with this interpretation, because of the obvious problems that the "little guy" has in this situation. Nonetheless, it is our democracy.
The natural opposition to the big money was "identity politics" practiced by the Democrats, who wanted to pull the heartstrings of various people, ethnically and via gender. But I believe that the electorate has reasoned that just because someone is of a certain gender or ethnic group, it does not rationally follow that they will support members of that group, and it also fortifies the opposition. As suggested in the essay, it seems that the American people voted for Trump because he wasn't part of the Washington elite. I'm not big on restricting free speech and the serious money will always make an impression. Nonetheless, I think it is still viable that the voters choose someone who is not on the big-money payroll. I guess I still believe in democracy. The bigger problem is the bureaucracy that adheres to their philosophy without government accountability. Andrew Jackson was a big fighter for the rights of the people versus the power elite. I think there is still hope in that, but to change it now will take someone out of the Washington elite circle of influence, someone who can't be bought. They're out there in this democracy, we just haven't found them yet.
Benjamin Goldstein Added Nov 28, 2017 - 11:57am
Jeff, I think I agree with sheer every sentence of your article. My only issue is that I agree with it ... so hm ... for me it is a bit too echo-chamberly and I have not quite understood what the takeaway is. No proposal how to cut it down?
George N Romey Added Nov 28, 2017 - 2:57pm
Benjamin I doubt the current regime is stoppable. They bought the political system the one way people in the US make their voices known.
wsucram15 Added Nov 28, 2017 - 3:29pm
If companies donated they did it illegally or through a variety of sources. $5,000 was the limit until 2010.
denver l mason Added Nov 28, 2017 - 4:54pm







One, claiming that they know the will of God is rather pretentious on their part




 
denver l mason Added Nov 28, 2017 - 4:58pm
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mark henry smith Added Nov 28, 2017 - 5:03pm
I agree with everything Denver wrote after the y in duty.
denver l mason Added Nov 28, 2017 - 5:08pm
mark henry smith I don't even know what I wrote because it didn't load anything I wrote. lol
Jeff Michka Added Nov 28, 2017 - 5:57pm
Geo "Give up!" Romey sez: Benjamin I doubt the current regime is stoppable. They bought the political system the one way people in the US make their voices known.-In short, ol Geo is telling you to roll over and play dead, since, according to Geo, who never will do anything, nothing can be done.  Wow, does that reinforce the Geo narrative?
Jeff Michka Added Nov 28, 2017 - 6:00pm
Dave Volek sez: Then the next logical step is to develop a system of governance that does not have political parties, right? 

Right.  I know, it's in your book.  :-)
Dave Volek Added Nov 28, 2017 - 9:22pm
Jeff: You guessed right! The book is now available on Kindle and Kobo. One more retailer to go!
 
Bill H provided an interesting link on another thread. It seems to summarize the findings of the Mueller Investigation. https://www.dni.gov/files/documents/ICA_2017_01.pdf
 
You should expect more sinister forces (internal and external) trying to play mind games with the fickle, apathetic, and cynical voters.
 
It would be impossible for these forces to organize themselves in all the neighborhoods of the TDG.
 
Thanks for the plug!
Jeff Michka Added Nov 29, 2017 - 4:44pm
Dave V notes: You should expect more sinister forces (internal and external) trying to play mind games with the fickle, apathetic, and cynical voters.-Obviously and by examples at least on WB, the games worked, so you get the constant whine and drum beat of "Give up!!" and they believe it.
mark henry smith Added Nov 30, 2017 - 5:11pm
I think people are much too cynical about the resiliency of our system. Our democracy is a pendulum of political and social excess and always has been. We are not a reflective society and never have been. We are not the ancient Greeks pondering the deeper meanings of things, generally. We are much more tied to the ancient Roman ideals of conquer and absorb, rewarding our invading corporations with the spoils of war, and demanding tribute.
 
Look at it this way, we only fought one war in the past seventy years for the purpose of liberation. All of the others were to galvanize the citizens behind corporate growth. Oil has been the biggest spoil, and tribute is the foreign money that flows into the equities and bond markets. All the civilized world invested in Rome when it was at its height because it was the best, safest place to protect your assets. The legal system was more stable and fair than anywhere else in the world and the economic system grew faster.
 
Then they got lazy and creep corruption eliminated all of the advantages. We have a creep in the white house and the corruption in our system is staggering. Let's hope the next one has some Greek sensibility and some manners. I never imagined that we'd have a president that would make a tapeworm look attractive, but we are a great, great nation of great surprises good and bad.     
Jeff Jackson Added Nov 30, 2017 - 5:56pm
Thanks for the comments Mark. I think the Cold War was a war of liberation, certainly the Korean War was to stop the North Koreans from taking over the South Koreans and enslaving them into communism, as well as the Vietnam War, but we didn't do well at that liberation. We would like to liberate the Middle East, but, truth be told, they aren't interested in that kind of liberation; they are too entrenched in a religion of suppression of rights that we recognized centuries ago, as well as a constant desire to "get even" for slights and suppressions that occurred centuries ago. They can't let go of any of this. They're in what we would call a "pre-Enlightenment" stage, where we (the philosophers of the time, Rousseau, Locke, etc.) realized that religion-based government was another term for enslavement. Certainly, I'm not all-in with the corporate enslavement we now suffer from, but it's a darn sight better than other types.
Consider, too that oil is losing its grip, as electric cars and renewable resources are taking the stage. Perhaps in the not-too-distant future we can become so less dependent on oil that the corporations lose their grip. Solar, wind, and the like are free, the only expense is the mechanical equipment to harness those sources. What I think is interesting, also, is the oil companies that are looking at algae as a renewable source of energy. Who knows, maybe we'll all have our windmill in the backyard, while we farm crickets and cook them on our solar barbecues.
mark henry smith Added Dec 1, 2017 - 11:52am
Jeff, I understand that the argument for any war will be liberation, but what a terrible price to pay. Granada was to liberate a bunch of students, easily dealt with though negotiation, but no, we have to spend 50 billion dollars and send an army. Saddam was totally contained after Gulf 1, but no, he's falsely blamed for 9/11 then we're told this war of liberation, that the Iraqi's will praise us for and will pay for itself from the oil we'll steal. That's the truth.
 
Insane. Korea, maybe, but perhaps it would have been better just to let the Chinese have it. We don't have any problems with China now and that would mean we wouldn't have any problems with North Korea. Vietnam was sick. I know the arguments, and they're sick arguments from the viewpoint of democratic principles.
 
We have never fought a war to introduce democracy. All of our wars have been fought to protect capitalist interests. I'm saying that's a wrong approach, since capitalism has certainly shown itself to be a desirable system where it's been implemented, but to say it's democratic is deception as is the regime we have in power now.    
Jeff Michka Added Dec 3, 2017 - 12:38pm
JJ sez:it seems that the American people voted for Trump because he wasn't part of the Washington elite. I'm not big on restricting free speech and the serious money will always make a-Perhaps you do believe "money=free speech" ala Citizens United.  So more money you have the more free speech you have.  Pull the big money plug and things will change.  Reforming campaign activities can be done at a state level, yet the moaners and wailers like Geo R and potentially you can't do anything, or is it just unwilling to do anything?