Dr. King's 100th Birthday

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This is my 1st article of 2019; There will be a lot of anniversaries and there is one that I want to mention whose Birthday will come in 2 weeks. January 15, 2019 will  be the 100th Birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Although it is a National Holiday in America, Dr. King's message and words still have a impact on America 51 years after his death. 

I challenge those who claim to be an admirer of Dr. King to really listen to what he had to say to America that is so true today and here is a list:

1. The I Have a Dream Speech. The March on Washington was a historic moment for America. I suggest you listen to the entire Speech especially Dr. King's because if you only focus on the 30 second soundbite, you are truly missing the context of the Whole Speech! Definitely listen to it and don't skip ahead!

 

2. Read Dr. King's Books and transcripts of his speeches. Don't rely on Fox News and Conservative Media outlets to give you information about Dr. King because it is inaccurate and one sided. Read Dr. King's Books such as Why We Can't Wait and Where Do We Go From Here? You can also find Dr. King's Sermons and Speeches online at The Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Online Institute from Sanford University and listen to Community based radio programs who preempt their regular program and broadcast Dr. King's Speeches on the air. 

 

3. To Hear Dr. King speak in his own words, watch King: A Written Record from Montgomery to Memphis that was released 50 years ago one year after his death. You can watch it on Bounce TV online or ask your cable subscriber on MLK Day and on www.kanopy.com. This film is Dr. King in his own words, not a reenactment!

 

4. Volunteer!! Help out your fellow Human being by volunteering at your local Church, Community Group, and help those in need. Big or Small help is good enough. 

 

 

Comments

Mustafa Kemal Added Jan 7, 2019 - 1:48pm
Gregory, thanks for the reminder -for many  years i have regularly listened to Martin Luther Kings speeches on his birthday.
 
It is rejuvinating.
 
Mustafa
Gregory S. McNeill Added Jan 7, 2019 - 2:27pm
You are wrong Mogg.
If Dr. King was still alive today, he would definitely side with BLM and groups like BLM are following Dr. King's philosophy. BLM and groups like them didn't cause the racial divide of America, it is people like the Alt-Right and yourself who are ignorant. I suggest you really listen to Dr. King's speeches. 
Leroy Added Jan 7, 2019 - 2:50pm
It's a pity that his message of non-violence has been lost.  I am sure that he is rolling over in his grave over how his message has been twisted.
 
I agree with you, Gregory.  It is time we ALL listen to his message again.
Gregory S. McNeill Added Jan 7, 2019 - 2:59pm
You are wrong Mogg.
Dr. King addressed Police Brutality in his 1963 speech. I suggest you listen to THE ENTIRE SPEEECH!!
Ryan Messano Added Jan 7, 2019 - 3:37pm
If Obama and today's black liberal leaders represent the culmination of King's dream, it was one heck of a nightmare.
Ryan Messano Added Jan 7, 2019 - 3:39pm
I greatly admire Dr. King's speeches, but his idea of big government helping the black community, has destroyed the black family.  Did you  ever hear him call out Communism, Gregory?  I sure didn't. Communism has hurt American blacks way more than slavery has, and it still does it.
FacePalm Added Jan 7, 2019 - 3:55pm
Gregory-
Given your oft-repeated antipathy toward white people for nothing other than the color of their skin, i'd suggest that you drop the pretense to being any kind of disciple of the Rev. Doc.
 
Probably THE most important phrase from the "I have a dream" speech, that people are NOT to be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of they character, you spit, piss, and crap on every time you join with BLM and Antifa to despise white  people, the imaginary "white privilege," and condemn "white males," you foment racism.
 
Now, although Martin Luther King Junior had some great things to say, there is tarnish on his halo; he was a rather routine philanderer and adulterer.  But let's review some of the great things he preached, all the same:
 
"It is precisely because education is the road to equality and citizenship, that it has been made more elusive for Negroes than many other rights. The walling off of Negroes from equal education is part of the historical design to submerge him in second class status. Therefore, as Negroes have struggled to be free they have had to fight for the opportunity for a decent education."
-- Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.(1929-1968), US civil rights leader, 14 March 1964
 
Now, however, black students(especially in HS) routinely bully any of their fellows considered to be "smart," but surprisingly, give no quarter to fellow blacks.
 
”One has not only a legal but a moral responsibility to obey just laws, but conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws."
-- Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.(1929-1968), US civil rights leader
 
...you know, like assault, battery, murder, incitement to murder...would those be just laws, or unjust laws, and who is teaching the difference today?
 
"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.  We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny.  Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly."
-- Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-1968), US civil rights leader
Letter from the Birmingham Jail, April 16, 1963
 
...like white people gathering in public to pray being smashed over the head with locks in socks, or getting burned or maimed by having fireworks explode on them, or from being sprayed with pepper/bear spray, or being spat upon or egged or having feces and urine dumped on them, or beaten with sticks, truncheons, or fists ... you know, injustice...
 
"The means by which we live have outdistanced the ends for which we live.  Our scientific power has outrun our spiritual power.  We have guided missiles and misguided men."
-- Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., (1929-1968), US civil rights leader
 
And who, specifically, in BLM or antifa is promoting the peaceful guidance of men(women, too, these days)?
 
"In our struggle against racial segregation in Montgomery, Alabama, I came to see at a very early stage that a synthesis of Gandhi's method of nonviolence and the Christian ethic of love is the best weapon available to Negroes for this struggle for freedom and human dignity. It may well be that the Gandhian approach will bring about a solution to the race problem in America. His spirit is a continual reminder to oppressed people that it is possible to resist evil and yet not resort to violence."
-- Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., (1929-1968), US civil rights leader, 1958
 
And who in either antifa, blm, or bamn is teaching of either Christ OR Gandhi?  Their fruits are not those of love and non-violence, are they?
 
i can go on, you know.  Much like "christians" who claim the mantle but refuse to obey Christ, the members of neither Antifa, nor BLM, nor BAMN follow their alleged hero AT ALL, do they?  Or maybe you can name some exceptions?
Gregory S. McNeill Added Jan 7, 2019 - 4:17pm
FacePalm,
I don't hate White People and I am half White myself. I am addressing Racism! Facepalm, I suggest you watch the documentary as I have suggested and stop twisting my words. 
Ryan Messano Added Jan 7, 2019 - 4:31pm
 
Facepalm is right, Gregory.  Today's liberal black leaders do hate white people. That wasn't King's dream.  You don't punish innocent people who happen to be white for the sins of 150 years ago, ignoring that even blacks had slaves at the same time.
Autumn Cote Added Jan 7, 2019 - 4:36pm
Please note, it's against the rules to publish more than one article within a 48-hour period.  However, you're free to edit this article however you like.  As always, many thanks for your participation with Writer Beat.
Jeffry Gilbert Added Jan 7, 2019 - 5:39pm
you spit, piss, and crap on every time you join with BLM and Antifa to despise white people, the imaginary "white privilege," and condemn "white males," you foment racism
 
DING DING DING we have a WINNER!   
 
Jeffry Gilbert Added Jan 7, 2019 - 5:41pm
I am half White myself
 
In much the same way Pocahontas Warren is Indian apparently. 
Leroy Added Jan 7, 2019 - 6:22pm
"I am also Half Native American too!" --Gregory S. McNeill
 
"I don't hate White People and I am half White myself." --Gregory S. McNeill
 
Hmmm.  I call BS.
 
 
 
FacePalm Added Jan 7, 2019 - 6:36pm
Gregory-
i'd prefer it if you'd provide links to what you suggest others hear and see, assuming you'd like them to hear and/or see it.
 
But i didn't see you disavow the violence or incitements to violence of Antifa, Black Lives Matter, or By Any Means Necessary, and/or other Soros-affiliated "protest" groups, many under the aegis of the "media matters" dot org, and neither have i seen you condemn them, either.
 
Always remember and never forget, Gregory: hatred of ANY people for their skin color is racism.  Period.  If you bought into that crap about how the "dominant culture" DESERVES to be ill-treated and it's NOT racism, that's a damned lie you'd ALSO  be well-served to repudiate utterly and completely, even if not immediately (deprogramming sometimes takes some time).
 
To decry racism and at the same time encourage racism against whites is exactly how insanity gets spread in the world; despite the intent of the torturer in George Orwell's(Eric Arthur Blair's) "1984," no one sane can believe two mutually-exclusive things simultaneously without BECOMING insane.
Ryan Messano Added Jan 7, 2019 - 6:40pm
 
Facepalm: Always remember and never forget, Gregory: hatred of ANY people for their skin color is racism. 
 
Finding anyone in the Democrat party who understands this is pretty difficult.
ChetDude Added Jan 7, 2019 - 11:16pm
Gregory: Thanks for posting this.

My favorite speech of his was "Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam." given at Ebenezer Baptist Church on April 30, 1967.  "The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who in a period of moral crisis maintain their neutrality."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zyE4eo_leX8

One of the saddest days in my life was the day he was murdered.  His and RFK's murders in '68 pretty much signaled the end of real hope and progress in USAmerica for generations...

And your article sure brought out some clear, pristine examples of what Dr. King was talking about and fighting against, didn't it?
 
===========================================

Mogg, Leroy, Ryan, Facepalm: Thank you for showing up and sowing your peculiar brand of hatred.  You've proved that the racism and hatred that Dr. King worked against are alive and well in USAmerica... 
 
Congratulations, boys...
ChetDude Added Jan 7, 2019 - 11:17pm
PS: Dr. King was a Socialist...
FacePalm Added Jan 7, 2019 - 11:34pm
ChetDud-
"Hatred."  Yeah, hatred of the most failed and brutal form of governance ever known on this planet, socialism.
 
But perhaps you'd like to back up your claim that King was a socialist.
He was a Christian, most certainly, but to infer he was a follower, adherent, or promoter of Marx, Engels, Stalin, or Mao is patently absurd, as all the foregoing were atheists and promoted atheism.
Leroy Added Jan 8, 2019 - 12:02am
"Mogg, Leroy, Ryan, Facepalm: Thank you for showing up and sowing your peculiar brand of hatred.   You've proved that the racism and hatred that Dr. King worked against are alive and well in USAmerica..."
 
Moi?  I was supportive of the article and the work of Dr. King.
 
I called Gregory out, but how does that make me a racist or hate-filled?  Judge not a liar by the color of his skin but by the content of his words.
Flying Junior Added Jan 8, 2019 - 2:42am
Gregory,
 
It is a shame that fully five right-wing crazies felt called upon to educate you on race relations in the U.S. on this solemn occasion.  It seems to me that Gregory was careful not to mention Black Lives Matter just so he would not alienate your affections.
 
I got into researching King in my work with the elderly.  Ten years ago, I blogged on the beauty of the day of January 22nd 2009.  At the time I was reading Martin Luther King Jr. , A Profile edited by C. Eric Lincoln and A Testament of Hope edited by James Melvin Washington comprised of Dr. King's speeches and essential writings.
 
There is a wealth of thought and teachings just waiting for anyone who will take the time to learn.  Every year just around this time the public libraries are called upon to circulate as many copies of his books and works written about Dr. King as possible.  May God bless Dr. King.  His work made such a difference in our society.  The civil rights movement preceded Dr. King.  But his intelligence and eloquence will never be forgotten.  It hurts that heartless right-wing nutjobs such as Msr. Messano lay claim to his wisdom.
 
No.  You cannot claim the heritage of Dr. King unless you live by the precepts.  It seems to me that most of you righties are a lot more excited about disproving the function of social assistance and public welfare than you are about actually caring about classes of people who are victims of discrimination.  It would make Dr. King very sad to read your insulting bullshit.
The Owl Added Jan 8, 2019 - 3:37am
Every weekend on Boston's WGBH Radio is a program called Eric In The Evening that focuses on soft jazz over the years.  His selections are both charming an deeply typical of all of the time jazz was a staple of the broadcast industry.
 
On the weekend of the Martin Luther King holiday in January, Eric Jackson plays recordings of Kings speeches over the years.  Eric in the Evening is good listeneing whenever you tune it in, but his King Holiday program is Hone of those programs that you will want to hear ear-after-year.  It is a bold statement of Kings beliefs in his own voice, well worth listening to.
 
You can tune it in using one of the world radio play apps for your phone or from their website.  The station is WGBH, Boston on 89.7 mHz over the air or their all sign through programs like Tune-In from either an app or from WQBH.ORG's website
 
Give it a listen.
 
FacePalm Added Jan 8, 2019 - 6:04am
FJ-
You may well note that it's not a "solemn occasion" YET, for Martin's birthday isn't for a week or so.
 
i just would like to get Gregory on the record as to whether he supports the aforementioned orgs and the violence they routinely practice, or if he disavows and repudiates it, in the spirit of this American hero.
 
And your description of "five right wing crazies" doesn't include myself, right?
Leroy Added Jan 8, 2019 - 8:44am
Actually, I'm with Gregory on this one.  Let's celebrate the greatest of the man and his message.  Let's put aside the negative for a while.  You know; the negative reads much like Peegate.  I suspect much of it is government propaganda.  In any case, let's put it aside for now.  Let's put aside Gregory's rhetoric.  Let's celebrate the accomplishments of the man.   Let's re-ignite the message and hope it spreads like wildfire.
opher goodwin Added Jan 8, 2019 - 9:44am
King was a very brave and wise man - a great beacon of light in dark days. I wish we had someone of his magnitude around today. Sadly there are none. I listen to his speeches regularly. He is a great inspiration. Thanks for the reminder.
Stone-Eater Added Jan 8, 2019 - 10:00am
Gregory
 
I don't know if he was genuine or not, I didn't know him personally, and I rarely trust public figures. Mother Theresa wasn't quite the Theresa people thought of her. Read about Lotti Latrous for example, a Swiss lady who has been helping people in Ivory Coast for decades but went largely unnoticed. I admired Gandhi or Sankara, and I certainly approve what King said and what Jesus apparently said as well. 
 
But undoubteldy King had a large influence for a better acceptance of Black people in the US. He threw the first stone. But don't forget Rosa Parks. These people had heaps of courage and despite a complete lack of power and public praise they were influential before King entered the scene.
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_Parks
 
https://lottilatrous.ch/index.php/en/persons/lotti-latrous
Even A Broken Clock Added Jan 8, 2019 - 10:27am
Gregory - good post, but one thing to note. Martin Luther King Jr. was born in 1929, not 1919. This makes the upcoming observance of his birth the 90th year since his birth, not his centenary.
Mustafa Kemal Added Jan 8, 2019 - 11:42am
As I said, I listen to Kings speeches every year -it is very rejuvinating.

Cant say as much about this thread, except Leroy's comments were in that spirit, IMO.
 
Mustafa
Flying Junior Added Jan 8, 2019 - 3:12pm
you are correct Mustafa
 
this entire thread is an embarassment
 
I like what Leroy said about Peegate.  Lots of love there.
 
i just would like to get Gregory on the record as to whether he supports the aforementioned orgs and the violence they routinely practice, or if he disavows and repudiates it, in the spirit of this American hero.
 
You dishonor Dr. King
Ward Tipton Added Jan 8, 2019 - 4:04pm
"I admired Gandhi or Sankara, and I certainly approve what King said and what Jesus apparently said as well. "
 
Have you not looked at the history of Gandhi when he was an attorney in Africa? Not exactly any more charming than Mother Theresa blaming people in pain for not praying hard enough or with enough faith instead of allowing them to have pain medication. 
Jeffry Gilbert Added Jan 8, 2019 - 6:23pm
born in 1929, not 1919. This makes the upcoming observance of his birth the 90th year 
 
Such reverence, such inaccuracy. 
 
Greg proves the efficacy of The Bell Curve once again. 
 
Oops. 
 
Leroy Added Jan 8, 2019 - 6:43pm
Give him a break, Captain; he's 50% Native American, 50% White, and 50% Black.
FacePalm Added Jan 8, 2019 - 6:56pm
FJ-
You dishonor Dr. King,
 
Uh, huh.  You want to spell that out?
Do you also want to tell me how Black Lives Matter, By Any Means Necessary, and Antifa honor MLK more than i, when they routinely engage in violence upon the innocent?
 
And as to your accusation of "crazy," earlier, i'd venture to posit that anyone who blindly hates the president(or anyone) and refuses to acknowledge ANY good that he has done has let their hatred blind them and make them - demonstrably so - leave the path of sanity, far, far behind.
Gregory S. McNeill Added Jan 8, 2019 - 8:00pm
To Ryan:
You are wrong. Our nation was founded on Slavery and Forcing Native Americans off of their land. That is a historical fact. I suggest you read history.and to FacePalm, Dr. King would side with BLM because they are morally right and the movement is mostly Black Women including the Metoo Movement. BLM doesn't cause violence. Here is a recent interview from one of the co-founders of the organization from The Economist.
BLM
https://www.economist.com/open-future/2018/08/09/black-lives-matter-is-not-a-terrorist-organisation
FacePalm Added Jan 8, 2019 - 8:19pm
So you side with those who promote and engage in violence on the innocent.  Show me ANY incident where MLK even yelled at police or anyone else, much less promoted and chanted lovely sayings like "Pigs in a blanket, fry like bacon" or "What do we want?"  "Dead cops!"  "When do we want 'em?"  "Now!"
 
But at least you didn't stick up for Antifa or BAMN...but i do notice that you didn't condemn them, either.  "That's ok; i didn't throw stones to kill christians, i just held the coats of the stone-throwers and approved..."  An old excuse that didn't have value then, and has no value now.
 
You should probably read some of the history of Black Lives Matter.  It would be interesting to see you take each of the specified incidents, then compare it with ANY of MLK's writings or speeches for ANY words of his which would justify those actions...but i rather doubt you're honorable enough to justly tackle a project of this nature.
Jeffry Gilbert Added Jan 8, 2019 - 8:31pm
Give him a break, Captain; he's 50% Native American, 50% White, and 50% Black.
 
There is that. 
 
I remain 100% unimpressed. 
 
Jeffry Gilbert Added Jan 8, 2019 - 8:33pm
but i rather doubt you're honorable enough to justly tackle a project of this nature.
 
I'd have to agree with that conclusion. 
FacePalm Added Jan 8, 2019 - 9:02pm
Cap'n-
It's SO hard to fight a battle of wits with so little ammunition...
 
Off-topic, but i heard that the Southern part of Thailand was devastated by a storm recently; it appears you made it through ok, though.  Hope that your boat(s) did, as well.
Jeffry Gilbert Added Jan 8, 2019 - 9:27pm
the Southern part of Thailand was devastated by a storm recently; it appears you made it through ok, though.  Hope that your boat(s) did, as well.
 
Thanks, that was all several hundred kilometers to the south of us we came through without a scratch. 
 
Flying Junior Added Jan 9, 2019 - 1:34am
Face,
 
Show me the last five times Black Lives Matter was implicated in political violence.  I shouldn't open myself up like this.  But the last time I remember any violence perpetrated by the left was two years ago at the inauguration of the monster.  And no, Charlottesville does not count.  Thank the Goddess that the death of Heather Meyer was not in vain.  Racist hate groups in the United States have been on the run ever since the horrific reality of the Unite the Right was exposed to the light of day that sad and violent weekend.
 
I'm sure you will have a plethora of fake news in your quiver.  But I mean in all seriousness.  Black Lives Matter is about supporting blacks who are victims of violence, police brutality and other crimes.  What you listen to every day, day in and day out, is nothing but a pack of lies.  Dr. King would very much be aligned with the Black Lives Matter movement were he alive today.
Ward Tipton Added Jan 9, 2019 - 4:31am
"Give him a break, Captain; he's 50% Native American, 50% White, and 50% Black."
 
I am half Irish, half German, half Texan and half Hillbilly, born in the US and more than half my overseas living in foreign lands ... I think ... therefore I am ... cornfused. 
FacePalm Added Jan 9, 2019 - 5:08am
FJ-
i provided a link for Gregory; you're welcome to click it and inform your discretion, or not, as you will.
FacePalm Added Jan 9, 2019 - 5:21am
FJ-
Seriously?  You apparently are unaware of what routinely happens in Portland, Oregon (and other cities run by democrats who stand down instead of upholding the Rule of Law by prosecuting evildoers).  Websearches are SO easy, today, there's really no excuse for ignorance at this level any more - except, perhaps, wilful ignorance.
 
There's no way in hell that MLK would EVER affiliate himself with BLM or BAMN, and especially not Antifa, based on his determined non-violent resistance approach, his status as a Christian leader and disciple of Christ, and his emulation of Gandhian tactics. Gandhi also loved Christ, and quoted Him often.
 
All three of the named orgs deliberately engage in violence, not just to people but to private property.  One group of them marched to Tucker Carlson's HOUSE and damaged his front door, while his wife, home alone, hid in a closet - but she would have been fully justified to level shotgun blasts at them.  Those who engage in these sorts of intimidation, vandalism, and coercive affronts to humanity need prosecution, and a lot of it, to induce a change to more civilized behavior...or outright removal from civilized society.
 
i have heard that there have been several "visits" to various members of the aforementioned groups, which is one reason why the violence has decreased, lately - oh, that and being named by the FBI as a "domestic terrorist" organizations(in the case of Antifa) may have also helped.
 
But it took well over a year before ANY democrat leader voiced the SLIGHTEST opposition to these tactics.  Why is that, do you think?
Ward Tipton Added Jan 9, 2019 - 5:37am
There were once rumors, that King was actually removed by the proverbial powers that be because he would not actively pursue social discord as a means to implement change and divide the people, and his efforts to unite people of all colors were proving so successful. Look at those who took his place after he was tragically murdered. 
Stone-Eater Added Jan 9, 2019 - 12:00pm
Ward
 
Have you not looked at the history of Gandhi when he was an attorney in Africa?
 
No. Probably have to read more about it......blank spot. There are also people who said that Mandela had his dark side, but that also I can't really comment. One can't know everything ;-) All I know is that often such "martyrs" are used exactly by an opposing side to channel people who are against a ruling party.
 
Like the darknet. I mean that's not "dark". The deep state will know much more precisely who is a "criminal" or working against their agenda when they're all in the same place.....
Ward Tipton Added Jan 9, 2019 - 12:19pm
The Darknet or Tor ... the deep web or whatever moniker you choose, is a DoD construct ... Department of Defense LOL And people think they did not build in any back doors? Ask the owner of Silk Road how well his anonymity lasted. 
Stone-Eater Added Jan 9, 2019 - 1:13pm
AH!
 
I knew it.
Stone-Eater Added Jan 9, 2019 - 1:14pm
...and thanks. Finally I know what DoD means :-)
FacePalm Added Jan 9, 2019 - 6:10pm
Ward-
Look at those who took his place after he was tragically murdered.
 
Like Jesse Jackson, for example?  What a piece of ...work... he is.  One of my friends in the intel community said that he was nothing more than a shakedown artist, using the threat of bad publicity and "protests" by black people as a way to extort bribes to go away.
 
Made him quite wealthy; don't think he did much good for black people, though...after all, what could they learn from his example?
 
But based on the defense of BLM here, and the insistence that MLK would have fully backed them, i think the important lessons he taught have been forgotten, more's the pity.  MLK came out strongly against the Black Panthers and others who employed violence to reach THEIR ends, for example - so based on what i know about him, he most certainly would NOT have endorsed BLM, either their words or their tactics, but condemned them in the strongest possible terms without resorting to invective or epithets.  BLM aren't uniters; they're dividers intent on perpetuating the identity politics which are inherently and intentionally divisive.  If they WEREN'T, they'd've certainly embraced the ALL lives matter movement, too.
 
"All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others," said the pigs in Animal Farm...and there's the crux of the issue.
Ward Tipton Added Jan 9, 2019 - 6:49pm
"MLK came out strongly against the Black Panthers and others who employed violence to reach THEIR ends, for example - so based on what i know about him, he most certainly would NOT have endorsed BLM, either their words or their tactics, but condemned them in the strongest possible terms without resorting to invective or epithets."
 
Which again, leads to strong suspicion that this is actually the reason he was killed. The government needs we the people to be divided to maintain their position as rulers lording over us. 
Ryan Messano Added Jan 9, 2019 - 7:27pm
 
Umm, no Gregory, we weren't founded on slavery.  Africa had slavery long before America, and still does, so get your facts straight.  If someone came to your home dressed in a loincloth, who couldn't read or speak English, I bet you wouldn't hire them.  Well, Americans did look at them funny too.  We even fought a war over it.  Please go read books on the Founders and the Civil War and educate yourself.  You are embarrassingly uninformed.  What school did you graduate from?  They did a piss poor job of educating you.
FacePalm Added Jan 10, 2019 - 4:10am
In a sense, Gregory is right; America WAS built on slavery, and long before it was called "America," too.
 
The Native Americans routinely enslaved each other long before the white man came, and long before the first blacks were imported from Africa, usually bought from black slave owners.  I seem to recall one black guy in Louisiana who owned more slaves than almost any white man in the South, too, something like 2,500 of them.  But i haven't seen a modern day black man yet who traced his ancestry back to a black slave owner and demanded reparations from HIS descendants...ever wonder why that might be?
 
Then i ran across the following wry-yet-accurate statement which seems to sum things up rather well:
 
Black people who were never slaves are fighting white people who were never Nazis over a confederate statue erected by democrats because democrats can't stand their own history anymore - and somehow it's all Trump's fault.
 
 
ChetDude Added Jan 10, 2019 - 2:54pm
Facepalm, Jeffry, Leroy, Ryan

Your relief is palpable now that the Great Orange Turd in the WH has enabled you to freely vent your bile in public again...

"May all the poisons that lurk in the muck, hatch out."  
Emperor Claudius' comment about the ascension of Donald Trump as Commander-in-Chief of the haters in USAmerica...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMKSwcZNpd8

Dr. King was killed because he "came out" in 1967 as an Anti-War Socialist...
 
---------------------------------------------------
 
Correction: White Supremacist, Wanna' Be Nazis - white boys who WOULD have been Dixiecrats/KKK in the "good ole' days" and who voted for Trump, their enabler (if they voted at all) - overtly threatened Black and Jewish People in their homes...many physically attacked people and one of them murdered an innocent woman.
Ana Ross Added Jan 10, 2019 - 11:16pm
Here is what Antifa stands for.  If you dont like it, tough!
https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2017/08/what-the-alt-left-was-actually-doing-in-charlottesville.html
same for BLM
FacePalm Added Jan 11, 2019 - 12:59am
Ana-
There are over 600 documented incidences of leftists attacking Trump supporters.  THAT is what they stand for: "bash the fash."  Who are the "fash"?  Everyone who disagrees with their political views.
 
If you don't like it, tough!
 
Those on the right have shown extraordinary patience, so far; groups like the Proud Boys were formed to protect ordinary Americans who wished to simply gather in public to pray for the president.  Antifa attacked them, with bear/pepper spray, bags of urine and feces, fireworks, locks in socks, sticks, bats, truncheons - and a few were caught on tape advocating the use of firearms, and were invited to an antifa member's car to see their firearms after having been given a knife.  There are vids of antifa attacking a guy in a WHEELCHAIR, for God's sake!  Then, there's the mounds of litter and the damage from vandalism to private property - seriously, is this what you want for America?
 
If/when those on the right say "Enough," antifa is dead meat walking(for now)  Those on the right are far better armed, trained, and physically able than the scrawny meth-head zombies of antifa.
 
One last thing: on every "reply" page, in the tool window, there are 4 symbols.  To the R of the U, there is a symbol which slants to the right that looks like links in a chain.  If you type a word, say "Antifa," then highlight it, then click on the "link" icon, you'll get a pop-up window with a space for the URL.  Cut'n'paste the URL there, enter it, and you'll get what you see above, a clickable link that takes up a lot less room AND makes it more likely that someone will actually click on it.
 
Also, are the FBI wrong for having named Antifa a "domestic terror group"?  If yes, please explain...
FacePalm Added Jan 11, 2019 - 1:11am
ChetDude-
i replied before, but it appears that it was either deleted on purpose, or somehow it simply didn't post(though i DID check, and it DID post), so now i'll try to re-create it, and see if it stays this time:
 
Facepalm, Jeffry, Leroy, Ryan

Your relief is palpable now that the Great Orange Turd in the WH has enabled you to freely vent your bile in public again...

 
Just curious; would you point out exactly what "bile" there was, and how any of it was untrue to the slightest degree?  After all, your SAYING it's bile doesn't make it so.

"May all the poisons that lurk in the muck, hatch out."  
Emperor Claudius' comment about the ascension of Donald Trump as Commander-in-Chief of the haters in USAmerica...

target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMKSwcZNpd8

 
A waste of time; the link goes to an actor speaking Claudius' lines, and has zip point shit to do with Trump.(a hint for anyone wanting to know what's up w/o bothering to click the link.)

Dr. King was killed because he "came out" in 1967 as an Anti-War Socialist...
 
i agree that MLK decried and denounced the Viet Nam war; i do NOT agree that he embraced socialism to the slightest degree.  You have made a claim - substantiate it or retract, if you have any honor.   I'd also love to see where you or ANYONE interviewed King's murderer, and that he confessed that this was his reason for murdering MLK, too.

 
Correction: White Supremacist, Wanna' Be Nazis - white boys who WOULD have been Dixiecrats/KKK in the "good ole' days" and who voted for Trump, their enabler (if they voted at all) - overtly threatened Black and Jewish People in their homes...many physically attacked people and one of them murdered an innocent woman.  
 
Are you now referring to the Charlottesville Show?  Are you aware that the "leader" of the White Supremacists was an Occupy Wall Street and staunch D'OhBama supporter 6 months prior?  Can you say "false flag"?  Would it surprise you to learn that most of the "White Supremacist" orgs in America have been infiltrated by so many police and police-types now that they actually outnumber the original racists?  In any case, the "White Supremacists" are a statistically insignificant number nowadays, a tiny percentage of the white population; did you see last summer's "rally" on the mall in DC?  i think it was a total of NINE that showed up.  Antifa were so pissed they began attacking police, since they didn't have enough "White racists" to attack.
Ward Tipton Added Jan 11, 2019 - 5:15am
And I believe you will find that the White Supremacists are also highly decried and ostracized by those both on the left and on the right ... that is at least if your view of Right includes less government and conservatism and does not extend out only so far as fascism. 
ChetDude Added Jan 11, 2019 - 9:43pm
Facepalm:  Look it up yourself - search "Martin Luther King Socialist" there are pages of cites.  Among them are:
 
'In 1952 a 23-year-old Martin Luther King Jr. wrote a love letter to Coretta Scott. Along with coos of affection and apologies for his hasty handwriting, he described his feelings not just toward his future wife, but also toward America’s economic system. “I am much more socialistic in my economic theory than capitalistic,” he admitted to his then-girlfriend, concluding that “capitalism has outlived its usefulness.”
'King composed these words as a grad student on the tail end of his first year at the Boston University School of Theology. And far from representing just the utopianism of youth, the views expressed in the letter would go on to inform King’s economic vision throughout his life.'
 
'In 1964, accepting the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, he observed that the United States could learn much from Scandinavian “democratic socialism.” He often talked about the need to confront “class issues,” which he described as “the gulf between the haves and the have-nots.”'
 
Of course, right-wingers like your progenitors in the early 60s called MLK a Communist - one of the nicest things y'all called him...
ChetDude Added Jan 11, 2019 - 9:46pm
PS: As an activist in the 60s through the 2000s, I often worked with people who also worked with Dr. King. 
A large percentage of them verified the fact that he knew he was a Socialist...
Ryan Messano Added Jan 11, 2019 - 10:11pm
King's socialistic and communistic ideas were a troubling aspect of his activism.  The website link is not 100% correct, but has many interesting insights, that are correctly cited.  Also, his adultery was a big problem.  However, he did address a real issue, racism. 
 
Chetdude, can you explain the vision that America's Founders had, and how it was influenced by noted philosophers, the Bible, Cicero, Cato, Plato, Socrates, and many of the seminal figures of the past 5,000 years?
John Minehan Added Jan 11, 2019 - 10:59pm
"I have bad news for you, for all of our fellow citizens, and people who love peace all over the world, and that is that Martin Luther King was shot and killed tonight.
 
Martin Luther King dedicated his life to love and to justice for his fellow human beings, and he died because of that effort.
 
In this difficult day, in this difficult time for the United States, it is perhaps well to ask what kind of a nation we are and what direction we want to move in. For those of you who are black--considering the evidence there evidently is that there were white people who were responsible--you can be filled with bitterness, with hatred, and a desire for revenge. We can move in that direction as a country, in great polarization--black people amongst black, white people amongst white, filled with hatred toward one another.
 
Or we can make an effort, as Martin Luther King did, to understand and to comprehend, and to replace that violence, that stain of bloodshed that has spread across our land, with an effort to understand with compassion and love.
 
For those of you who are black and are tempted to be filled with hatred and distrust at the injustice of such an act, against all white people, I can only say that I feel in my own heart the same kind of feeling. I had a member of my family killed, but he was killed by a white man. But we have to make an effort in the United States, we have to make an effort to understand, to go beyond these rather difficult times.
 
My favorite poet was Aeschylus. He wrote: 'In our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart until, in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God.'
 
What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence or lawlessness; but love and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or they be black.
 
So I shall ask you tonight to return home, to say a prayer for the family of Martin Luther King, that's true, but more importantly to say a prayer for our own country, which all of us love--a prayer for understanding and that compassion of which I spoke.
 
We can do well in this country. We will have difficult times; we've had difficult times in the past; we will have difficult times in the future. It is not the end of violence; it is not the end of lawlessness; it is not the end of disorder."  Sen. Robert F. Kennedy
 
But the vast majority of white people and the vast majority of black people in this country want to live together, want to improve the quality of our life, and want justice for all human beings who abide in our land.
Let us dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world.
Let us dedicate ourselves to that, and say a prayer for our country and for our people.




target="_self">Tribute to John F. Kennedy at the Democratic National Convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey, August 27, 1964
target="_self">Day of Affirmation Address, University of Capetown, Capetown, South Africa, June 6, 1966
target="_self">Day of Affirmation Address (News Release Version),



Flying Junior Added Jan 12, 2019 - 2:47am
I like you Ana Ross.  I want to be your friend.  Welcome to the WB.
FacePalm Added Jan 12, 2019 - 8:47am
ChetDude-
Thanks for honoring your word and supplying the information you did.
That said, to be socialistic is not definitive proof of being socialist.
I confess that i don't know why he would oppose capitalism, unless he was referring to the relatively obvious injustices of corporate entities wrapping themselves in capitalism, which in truth was and is nothing more than "crony" capitalism, which IS bad...just like those corporate entities who were then and are now part and parcel of the MIC.
 
Now, i followed your advice and websearched "dr martin luther king jr, socialist," then found the following 3min clip.  The closest i saw him come to a socialist position was when he stated that it was time for a "radical redistribution of economic power."  He didn't say "money."  To a large degree, this has indeed happened, as there are very few educated black people today who are living in poverty.  i know quite a few personally who are doing far better than i, for example, right now...and have knowledge of many, many more - comedians, actors, attorneys, sports figures, professors, entrepreneurs(FUBU, etc.) - the list goes on and on.
 
What i think those on the left are doing is seizing upon tiny fractions of King's speeches to extrapolate and insinuate socialism where none actually exists, in truth. 
 
He was VERY good at illustrating the difference between the MIC spending hundreds of thousands to kill each Vietnamese, but less than 60 bux on poor people, black OR white, though.  It was this brilliance which makes his words live on - and, apparently, has resulted in a tug of war as to whose "side" he was on, too.
 
i think that's easy to determine; he was on the side of the poor and oppressed, of whatever race, creed, or gender...just like Christ is.  i think that the philosophy reached to get there was of quite little importance, compared to the results of actually getting there.
 
When more blacks join the #walkaway, follow Kanye West and Candace Owen's examples and resort to self-help to solve their problems of generational dependency, they'll solve their own problems.  This starts with refusing to allow themselves to be used as plantation voters any longer, in my opinion.  When they seek and get help from mentors to raise themselves up to prosperity instead of allowing themselves to be stuck in drug-and-violence-ridden ghettos, when they stop mocking, ridiculing, and bullying the smarter ones among them, when they practice true justice and refrain from injustice, a great Day will dawn upon them, just like it dawns upon all people of every race, creed, and color who do similarly.  "Out of Many, One" is a great motto; listening to manipulators who try to scam and deceive and cheat their way to a false idea of "prosperity" is to doom themselves to perpetual poverty, both of pocket and of spirit.
Flying Junior Added Jan 12, 2019 - 10:46pm
Kanye West is mentally ill.  That's the only reason he likes the Donald.
ChetDude Added Jan 12, 2019 - 10:58pm
Gee, Facepalm, I'm surprised you left out the greatest "Black person Shamer" of them all, Bill Cosby...
 
If Dr. King were alive today and bothered responding to any of the nonsense you and your RW friends post, he would also try to patiently explain the need to end the wars and embrace Socialism too...
ChetDude Added Jan 12, 2019 - 11:01pm
There was a perfectly accurate term used for counter-productive folk like Cosby, West, Owen and Carson -- and it started with "Uncle" and then rhymed with the first name of the execrable POS who is the least qualified Justice to ever "serve" on SCOTUS...
Flying Junior Added Jan 13, 2019 - 2:08am
Dom Trump?
Ward Tipton Added Jan 13, 2019 - 2:22am
"There was a perfectly accurate term used for counter-productive folk like Cosby, West, Owen and Carson -- and it started with "Uncle" and then rhymed with the first name of the execrable POS who is the least qualified Justice to ever "serve" on SCOTUS..."
 
While Uncle Tom is admittedly a fictional character, I find the fact that you believe that the name of someone who gave their life to assist slaves in attaining their freedom to be a derogatory term very revealing. Then again, I am guessing there would not be much freedom in your communist dystopia either. 
 
 
Leroy Added Jan 13, 2019 - 8:02am
Great message, John Minehan.  If we could learn that, we could live at peace with one another.  So could the Israelis and the Palestinians.
 
As to Dr. King being a socialist, I say give it a rest.  Maybe he was; maybe he wasn't.  My understanding is that he was a Republican, not that it proves one way or the other that he was a socialist.  Does it really matter one way or the other?  Let us not be distracted from the message.  We can live in peace with one another and still disagree.
FacePalm Added Jan 14, 2019 - 1:22am
Leroy-
An admirable sentiment, but imo too sentimental.  Here's what a socialist means by "peace":
 
"The meaning of peace is the absence of opposition to Socialism."
-- Karl Marx(1818-1883) German philosopher, father of Communism, co-author of the 'Communist Manifesto'.
 
So as long as that attitude is maintained, all who resist any kind of tyranny will be at war with those whose goal is to impose one.
 
i loved RFK too, just like his brother.  Too bad democrats have strayed so far from what i saw as the "ideal" democrats long ago.  They were infiltrated and suborned by socialists, and are now the enemies of liberty, for the most part, unless they mean that some men believe they are entitled to the fruits of their own labor; others believe they are entitled to the fruits of the labor of others.
 
“They are the arguments that kings have made for enslaving the people in all ages of the world. You will find that all the arguments in favor of kingcraft were of this class; they always bestrode the necks of the people - not that they wanted to do it, but because the people were better off for being ridden. That is their argument and this argument of the judge is the same old serpent that says, “You work and I eat, you toil and I will enjoy the fruits of it.”
~Abraham Lincoln (The Life and Writings of Abraham Lincoln)
 
FJ-
Uh-huh.  What about Thomas Sowell, Candace Owens, Walter Williams, or dozens, nay, thousands of others who have freed themselves from the democratic slavery plantations?  Hear what this columnist had to say about D'OhBama:
 
"Welfare mostly subsidizes people in poverty, helping few escape from it. In their hearts, most people who are poor would like to be rich, or at least self-sustaining, but this president never talks about how they might achieve that goal. Instead, he criticizes those who made the right choices and now enjoy the fruits of their labor. Rather than use successful people as examples for the poor to follow, the president seeks to punish the rich with higher taxes and more regulations on their businesses."
-- Cal Thomas, Columnist. 2011
 
Just because YOU claim that Kanye is crazy doesn't make it so - and last time i checked, West has made it into the billionaire's club.  You?  (i haven't either, but i could use maybe a tenth of his kind of crazy.)
ChetDude Added Jan 14, 2019 - 2:23pm
Ward: If you're going to try to quote "literature", you might want to learn something about what you're quoting.  The "Uncle Tom" from the book is the opposite of what you're pretending he was.  In the book, he's like Cosby, Carson and West -- a dupe.

'Uncle Tom is an elderly slave. He lives in a little cabin near his master's house and has repeatedly proven himself to be meek and obedient. His master, Mr. Shelby, feels no qualms about selling Tom down the river to pay a debt.

    'On the boat, Tom meets an innocent young girl named Eva St. Clare, whose father is rich. St. Clare decides to buy Tom from his new master. St. Clare, buys Tom. Eva makes her father agree to free all his slaves when he dies.'

    'St. Clare dies before he can free Tom and the other slaves. Tom is then sold to a Southern plantation owner who beats Tom to death when Tom refuses to reveal the location of some runaway slaves.'

    'The character Uncle Tom has inspired the stereotype of the "Uncle Tom" character, a kind of passive, obedient African American who bends to the will of white characters.'
 
---------

Unlike real "Uncle Toms" in real life like Uncle (Clarence) Thomas, at least the Uncle Tom in the book realized how he had been used by the end of the novel and finally quit shuckin' and jivin' for the Man.

--------------------------------------------------

Facepalm: "The meaning of peace is the absence of opposition to Socialism."
-- Karl Marx(1818-1883)

This is an absolutely true statement.  Once the bringers of war, the dominators in dominator hierarchies who are now enabled by capitalism are removed, Peace will come...

Were RFK and Dr. King were alive today, he and Dr. King would be posting pretty much what I post -- and you'd hate them too...

The real quote should be "Poverty is a feature of capitalism, and 'charity' and 'welfare' mostly subsidizes people in poverty, helping few escape from it."  The escape will come with the advent of Socialism replacing capitalism...

--------------------------------------------------

Worker and Community (THE PEOPLE'S) OWNERSHIP of the means of production coupled with democratic processes for decision making that allows the people to achieve consensus about where, when and what to produce, how much and how to do it along with how to fairly and equally distribute what's produced. In order to work for society in a future that will increasingly be hampered by fossil-fueled, capitalist AGW/Climate Change, a primary goal of a Socialist society must be Sustainability according to the following definition:

1. The integration of human social and economic lives into the environment in ways that tend to enhance or maintain rather than degrade or destroy the environment;

2. A moral imperative to pass on our natural inheritance, not necessarily unchanged, but undiminished in its ability to meet the needs of future generations;

3. Entails determining and staying within the balance point among population, consumption and waste assimilation so that bioregions, watersheds and ecosystems can maintain their ability to recharge, replenish and regenerate.
ChetDude Added Jan 14, 2019 - 2:30pm
Tomorrow, Jan 15th is Dr. King's Birthday.  In his honor you should listen to his greatest speech.  This is a speech that he would doubtless give today about the greatest contributor to USAmerican moral and spiritual decay and financial poverty, the bi-partisan Forever War (to steal resources), the systemic underlying disease and the capitalist few whom it enriches:
 
Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zyE4eo_leX8
ChetDude Added Jan 14, 2019 - 2:32pm
Here, I'll make it easier for ya'...
Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam
FacePalm Added Jan 14, 2019 - 11:08pm
ChetDude-
i've said this before, and i'll say it again:
There are airports; go buy you a one-way ticket to either Venezuela or Cuba, and don't let the door hit you in the ass on the way out.
 
i don't think you ever got around to answering my question about why so many FLEE socialist countries as soon as they can, but virtually NO ONE wants to escape any place where capitalism has made people rich...instead, that's where former socialists flee TO.
 
And apparently, you're ok with the 40+ million Stalin murdered, both directly via starvation in the Ukraine, and indirectly via the Siberian gulags, as well as the ChiComs, who've killed nxs of 100 million of their own people, and continue killing more every single day.
 
Maybe you'd be happier in Red China; after all, you'll be photographed, videotaped, and recorded everywhere you go, and if you put a foot wrong, your "social credit score" will go down, and you'll find yourself unable to move an inch.  Enjoy your socialism!  Yay, right?  Socialist countries are like sieve nets; easy to get in, almost impossible to get out.  Why did they build walls, again?  Oh, yeah, to keep people from leaving.
 
So, see ya!  Wouldn't wanna BE ya!
 
That said, i'll listen to MLK's speech on Vietnam; i despised it myself, as i was on the "to be drafted" list back then.
FacePalm Added Jan 15, 2019 - 4:35am
One other thing:
Although i never read "Uncle Tom's Cabin," the very portion you posted describes his nobility, for he was BEATEN.  TO.  DEATH.  ...for refusing to disclose where runaway slaves were.  IOW, he gave his life to help others be free.  What, exactly, is ignoble, base, scurrilous or reprehensible about THAT?
 
As to Bill Cosby, he was a childhood hero of mine; i had a couple of his albums, and had memorized several of his very creative - and epithet-free - routines, like "Noah," "Deadman's Hill,"  "Frankenstein," and "The Leg That Burped."  Gave me the sense of comedic timing i retain to this day.
 
Too bad he turned out to be a creep who drugged and raped women, a lot of 'em.
 
Don't understand how his being exposed and convicted of being a rapist makes him an Uncle Tom to the slightest degree.  And even with that, i don't think that - on balance - his positive effects on society via his roleplaying outweigh his negative ones; in "I Spy," he made it possible for black men to perceive themselves as defenders of America.  As Dr. Huxtable, he provided a strong example of a competent black male half of a relationship with an equally strong female attorney, and did the "dad thing" in a way that many black men were quite likely inspired by, perhaps dozens of millions of them...far more, cumulatively, than the number of his victims, though when assessing the life of Cosby, it should never be forgotten how he stained his legacy permanently.
Leroy Added Jan 15, 2019 - 9:25am
Socialism and communism are great for population control.  Famines love it.
Flying Junior Added Jan 16, 2019 - 3:31am
Ninety year birth anniversary of Dr. King.  That is amazing.  He had an eloquence like no other.  That kind of truthfulness only comes from the heart.  I agree with some on this thread, his words condemning war and warfare were every bit as powerful as his thoughts on equality and civil rights.  He was one of the greatest and most transformational orators of all time.
 
I don't wish to rebuke my republican brothers and sisters, but the legacy of Dr. King is that his work was only a beginning.  That work continues to this day.  It has been attacked and staggered.  It has suffered lost battles and ongoing sieges.  The biggest mistake that we can make today is to consider that the work is finished.  And those who do not understand the struggle for equal opportunity and freedom from discrimination have no part in celebrating Dr. King's life.  We must continue to fight for the cause every day.
 
Black Lives Matter!
Ward Tipton Added Jan 16, 2019 - 7:09am
"I don't wish to rebuke my republican brothers and sisters, but the legacy of Dr. King is that his work was only a beginning.  That work continues to this day.  It has been attacked and staggered.  It has suffered lost battles and ongoing sieges.  The biggest mistake that we can make today is to consider that the work is finished."
 
Agreed to a very large extent. However, efforts to remove race from applications altogether are now deemed to be racist. Any effort at looking beyond race has been attacked as belittling and demeaning and any effort to integrate the races has been attacked as cultural appropriation and attacked through vitriolic diatribes coming from both sides. 
 
Seems to me some of those who scream racism the loudest are among the most obsessed with maintaining the status quo as a means to separate and divide we the people. 
Gregory S. McNeill Added Jan 16, 2019 - 10:37am
Ward,
America has a long way to go and it must honestly deal with its racist past. It is going to take years and we as a nation must be realistic about it. 
Gregory S. McNeill Added Jan 16, 2019 - 10:39am
FacePalm, I suggest you read Black Boy by Richard Wright and Why We Can't Wait by Dr. King. 
Ward Tipton Added Jan 16, 2019 - 10:58am
"America has a long way to go and it must honestly deal with its racist past. It is going to take years and we as a nation must be realistic about it. "
 
I would heartily agree here. However, I question the motives of the likes of Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton and Louis Farrakhan as much as I do those of David Duke ... different colors, same stripes ... so to speak. 
 
If you and I were to sit down together, search out our common ground and begin the discussion from there, it would be a great start, but so many people these days are so anxious to ostracize and feel superior in their own right, that even the slightest variation in beliefs often leads to labeling and ad hominem attacks that have nothing at all to do with the actual discussion. It is imperative to remember ... for all of us ... that merely drawing a different conclusion from the same set of facts is not in fact a personal attack. 
Gregory S. McNeill Added Jan 16, 2019 - 11:11am
You are right Ward, I disagree with you about Farrakhan. I am not a fan of Farrakhan, he was created because of Racism and you should learn more about the NOI than judge it. The NOI is a splinter group, not the original group. As for Sharpton, I am not a fan of his, he does have a point on some issues. African Americans cannot be racist, yes prejudiced, not racist. 
Benjamin Goldstein Added Jan 16, 2019 - 2:29pm
King was born 1929, idiot!
FacePalm Added Jan 16, 2019 - 6:21pm
Benjamin-
King was born 1929, idiot!
 
Had you read the comments(understandable if you didn't, because there are so many of them), you may have noted that you're being not only redundant, but unnecessarily critical.  The "idiot" remark, for example, might well be applied to any diligent reader of your articles, too, assuming that you made the slightest mistake in any of them, couldn't it?
 
It might be noted that Gregory may wish to change the title of his article, as it's off by a decade.  The spirit of the thing - to honor the memory of the non-violent Christian man, eloquent, determined, unbowed and undaunted by repeated arrests and imprisonments, the burning of his house, the bombing of his church - is what is being honored, here...despite claims to the contrary by my detractors, amongst others who have been foolishly demonized.
 
Gregory-
Thanks for the reading recommendations.  i don't have the funds needed to buy them, but i'll see if free online copies exist.
Flying Junior Added Jan 16, 2019 - 8:57pm
Here's the new thing.  Black Girls are Magic.  Or more simply, Black Girl Magic.
 
Here is to the nineteen black women elected as judges in Harris County Texas!
Jeffry Gilbert Added Jan 17, 2019 - 8:08pm
African Americans cannot be racist, yes prejudiced, not racist. 
 
Bullshit! 
 
Keep proving The Bell Curve you dolt. 
 
FacePalm Added Jan 17, 2019 - 9:55pm
Gregory-
African Americans cannot be racist, yes prejudiced, not racist.   
 
I missed this one, earlier.
Now, when i was going to school, "prejudice" was DEFINED as judging someone for the color of their skin as being "bad."  If you do the same, guess who just joined the racist klan?
 
Do you make an exception for South African blacks, too?  Remember, whites in S. Africa are being murdered simply for their skin color, and many socialist-leaning black S. Africans in their government are pushing to legalize theft, that is, taking everything a white farmer has just because of his/her skin color, and giving them ZERO compensation.
 
That's not ONLY racist, it's CRIMINALLY so.  Not even in Jim Crow America did anything THAT bad happen.  Lynchings, yes, but theft of farms, houses, barns, sheds, livestock and equipment? 
FacePalm Added Jan 17, 2019 - 10:36pm


BTW, i was able to find and dl "Black Boy," by Richard Wright, but not "Why We Can't Wait," by Dr. King.   The first was written in 1945 - and a lot has changed in the last 74 years - and the second was written in 1963, prior to JFK's assassination by elements of the Deep State, who were ALSO likely to be the ones truly behind the assassinations of both MLK and RFK in '68.
 
As Ward mentioned earlier, MLK was UNITING the races to oppose injustice everywhere - and the PtB, the satanist pedophile NWO/OWG cretins - want and rather insist on keeping people divided and at each other's throats, not only because they make Big Bux by selling war materiel to both sides, but because they love and promote chaos as being in the interests of the evil one and his minions.
 
"An injustice to ANYone ANYwhere is an injustice to EVERYone, EVERYwhere."
 
So if you continue to treat anyone unjustly, especially for nothing more than the color of their skin, you spit on MLK and everything he stood for.

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