What happens when socialist-minded government officials take over

Mass Transit Is a Gov’t Failure
Hans Bader
By Hans Bader | January 3, 2019 | 4:20 PM EST

 

So-called "mass transit" in the USA was not built by government, but by the private sector. What exists today is what socialist-minded government officials took over by means of draconian laws, taxation and regulations, particularly those that forced private companies to hold fares down to levels where they could not make money, thus "forcing" the government to step in. The rest was destroyed after the government officials deemed through central planning was "not needed".

 

On top of that, when road vehicles became commonplace, taxation was favorable to them versus the privately-owned bus, trolley and railroad companies. And all this became worse when air travel got a "boost" from government too. It's a fascinating yet sad history.

Comments

Jeff Michka Added Jan 10, 2019 - 9:13pm
Oldlog too High.  Yeah, that good ol private sector.  the same one that brought us penicillin and internet also brought us mass transit.  I knew they painted over "Smith bros Bus Lines and Koch bros rail company, right?  Umm I'm sure people reading your "blog" all believe ever word you write with real religious fervor, but got ANY cites for your "revelation.?  Eat more fiber to clear that blog, Oldlog.
Johnny Fever Added Jan 11, 2019 - 9:06am
Depending on the density of an area, mass transit is failure.  Where density is high, mass transit obviously is working.  Don’t believe me, take a look at how crowded the trains are in places like Boston, New York and London.  Where density is low, mass transit is unnecessary and obviously a failure.  No matter where it’s succeeding or failing, government would be doing the taxpayers a favor to step out of the way and let private corporations run mass transit systems for profit.  
Ward Tipton Added Jan 11, 2019 - 11:33am
There are vast numbers of government programs that have proved to be abject failures where private sectors would work better, especially if forced to compete for the markets.